Going from 3 to 4 wire set up for new range

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Old 09-09-08, 05:38 PM
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Going from 3 to 4 wire set up for new range

I've just bought a new range and am switching from the existing 3 wire setup to a 4 wire set up. It's a straight run from the fuse box to the range, no junction boxes or anything like that. I've got the 6/3 wire, new receptacle and cord. 2 years ago I ran new wire for my AC and my water heater when I put them in and also swapped out the old fuses for new ones so this isn't completely foreign to me but the two hot wires are throwing me and I thought it best to ask someone before I dove in. My fuse is 50 amps and appears to be comprised of two fuses that are connected. They both say 50. My question is, since there are only two terminals (aside form the ground connection) on the fuse, do I screw down both the hot wires under the same terminal and run the neutral one to the other one?
 
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Old 09-09-08, 06:40 PM
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No. One hot wire to each terminal, and the neutral to the neutral bus.

Is it really a "fuse" or are you talking about a circuit breaker?
 
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Old 09-09-08, 07:57 PM
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Ahh. Thank you very much John. It's a circuit breaker. After reading your reply I went back to inspect my breaker box and I see what you mean. My heating unit is wired like you mentioned, with one black and one red to the circuit breaker and the neutral screwed in at the top of what I'm guessing you are calling the bus.
 
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Old 09-09-08, 08:09 PM
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The range is likely prewired for a 3 wire connection, if so you must remove the frame bonding jumper connected to the neutral of the range terminal block. Do you see this in the instructions?
 
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Old 09-10-08, 06:33 AM
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You are correct Bruto. It is wired like that and the instructions do say to cut that connector if I am going to switch to a 4 wire set up. Thanks.
 
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Old 09-10-08, 07:18 AM
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Don't cut it if possible. Disconnect and cap it off, if it can be done safely. If you sell or give away the range later, it will be easier to reconnect if required.
 

Last edited by Gunguy45; 09-10-08 at 07:51 AM.
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Old 09-10-08, 07:41 AM
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Originally Posted by johnevan View Post
You are correct Bruto. It is wired like that and the instructions do say to cut that connector if I am going to switch to a 4 wire set up. Thanks.

Very good... follow the instructions (LOL) for the 4 wire connection and you will be cooking in no time.
 
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Old 09-10-08, 09:33 AM
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Gunguy, thanks for the tip. If it appears that I can do as you say, I'll do so.
 
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