Splicing into an existing wiring, but wire too short


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Old 09-15-08, 08:11 PM
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Splicing into an existing wiring, but wire too short

I am trying to put and addition 4 plug outlet in my garage. I do not want to use the same breaker for this as I have alot of things that already run off of the garage breaker. I have found that the wall inbetween my garage and house has a wire to two bedroom outlets. I have cut a hole in the garage wall and can get to the wire. The problem is that this wire is very tight (taunt), not alot of play. I am afraid that I won't be able to do this because of not enought wire to tie into. Anyone have any suggestions?
 
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Old 09-15-08, 08:30 PM
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By Code you can not tap into a run of romex (NM cable) inside a wall. All splices MUST be contained in a box. The box MUST have the cubic inch capacity for the wire in the box. The box MUST be accessible. (as in to do not have to damage the wall finish to get at it)

Your best option is pull a new 20 amp circuit (or 2 circuits) from your panel to your new fourplex outlet. Even if you have to fish a finished basement it would be worth the effort.

Another option (but not as good) is get to one of the outlet boxes serving the bedroom and start a new cable run from there to your fourplex outlet and tie into that circuit. This option could overload the existing circuit and cause the breaker to trip depending what else is on that circuit and what you are planing to run in your garage. (compressor, saw, shopvac)
 
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Old 09-15-08, 08:58 PM
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The other thing about the bedroom circuit is that it can not be used to feed the garage circuit at all.

You have to run new circuit to the attached garage this is the safest methold to do this.

And the garage receptales must be GFCI anyway.

Merci,Marc
 
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Old 09-16-08, 05:03 PM
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French, can you explain why you could not use the bedroom circuit to feed anything in the garage? Of the codes that I can think of the only one that comes to mind is that it would need to be AFCI protected.

However, I agree with you. Pulling a new circuit is the best option.
 
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Old 09-16-08, 07:14 PM
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Originally Posted by Tolyn Ironhand View Post
French, can you explain why you could not use the bedroom circuit to feed anything in the garage? Of the codes that I can think of the only one that comes to mind is that it would need to be AFCI protected.

However, I agree with you. Pulling a new circuit is the best option.
I glad you asked that question to me .,, Let me be fair with you.

From my past expernice I do see pretty good precentage of bedroom circuit useally wired with #14's and try to make a takeoff connection to garage is not a really wonderfull idea but if you are on 2002 or before then useally not much restrictions but 2005 and later with AFCI circuits then no,no it can not be feed to garage.

The other common mistake what I useally see it when peoples add new circuit to the garage circuit is that they useally forgot the GFCI reqirement { I allready saw few of like that }

Merci,Marc
 
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Old 09-19-08, 04:29 PM
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While I agree with you that it is not a good idea to use the bedroom circuit to feed the garage, but I see it to be no code violation to do so. The 2005 code requires that all bedroom outlets (outlets being receptacles, lighting and smoke det.) be protected by an AFCI. That circuit is not restricted to only the bedroom. It can feed other locations. They will just also have AFCI protection as well. The 2008 code requires ALL 120v, 15 and 20 amp circuits to be protected by an AFCI. Which will include the garage. As you pointed out, the garage receptacles also need to be GFCI protected as well.

Not that I would wire the garage off the bedroom circuit anyway. I agree it is a bad idea. Just not a code violation.
 
 

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