Entrance panel

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  #1  
Old 09-28-08, 05:52 PM
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Entrance panel

I am in the process of building a new house.

Before I started the house I built the garage (the garage has since been attached to the house through a short underground hallway/tunnel) so I could work out of it and store my materials and whatnot.

Rather than get a temporary, the power company allowed me to put my service entrance on the garage. I put a 200A 20 slot box in and used only one breaker. It is located on the far corner from the actual house.

Now that I'm doing the electric for the main house I'm wondering how I should go about this. I had originally thought I could put a 100A subpanel in the house part and work from that, leaving myself breaker space in the main for the garage. Someone told me there may be a question as to whether it would be considered attached. In addition I'm not sure that 100A would be enough.

I would appreciate any feedback on ideas for how I could go about this. Thanks

 
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Old 09-28-08, 06:05 PM
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I don't know if you done the load demand figures for the house side due you have pretty good size house there.

How many Sqft it is and is everything all electric or have gas stove , waterheater ,dryer , electric A/C ??

The reason why I ask you now before you actally get the cables etc to make sure if your breaker box will be big engouh to handle the load and the numbers of circuits as well.

You can able goggle load demand caluacations it will come up few diffrent format and it will expain how to do it if you have few question just holler one of us will help you with the load demand figures to see the right size box to be installed.

Merci,Marc
 
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Old 09-28-08, 06:16 PM
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It is all electric. It is a 1500 sq ft 25x60 ranch.
 
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Old 09-28-08, 07:07 PM
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Don,

Do you know the sizes of the air conditioner and/or heat pump circuits? Do you have electric backup heat?
 
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Old 09-28-08, 07:08 PM
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Will you/can you run the major appliances off the main panel (AC, stove, etc)? If it is easier to run them from the sub panel in your house, I would recommend setting up a 150A subpanel in the house. I think it would be a bit of a waste to have a 200A service where only 100A is really available (and 100A is 'lost' in the garage).

It shouldn't be all that expensive, looks like ~100' of wire, if you use aluminum (I think you'd use 4-conductor 2/0 wire, but someone else will confirm). Couple hundred dollars and you're all set for the future.

You'd use 4-wires to connect the two panels, which would cover yourself whether the structures are considered attached or detached. Besides, you're probably going to run phone/tv/etc. between the two anyway, so a 3-wire subpanel doesn't make sense. You'd probably want to check with the inspector to determine if you need a ground rod at your subpanel. From the way you describe it, I'd doubt it, but it's not a big deal regardless.

Good luck!
 
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Old 09-28-08, 07:14 PM
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There are couple of question to ask as PCboss got this one about A/C and back up heat.

However the other question is do you know what model number of the 200 amp load centre there ??

I came up few diffrent numbers but want to confirmed what brand and model number of 200 amp panel.

Merci,Marc
 
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Old 09-28-08, 07:41 PM
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I do not know the load for the heat/AC. I had been planning oil heat but am having someone come out in two weeks to discuss geothermal heat pump.

I do not know the model of load centre but can get it. I know its a Murray and has something to the effect of...."110 amps per branch circuit bus stab". I don't know if that pertains or not. At any rate I would like to have as much as I can get in the house but I assumed I couldn't get more than about 100 amps from one panel to another.

I am sure I went about this in the not so best way to begin with. Now that it is what it is, I'd appreciate some ideas/plans to take it from here to there.

Thanks again.
 
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Old 09-29-08, 04:02 PM
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If that is the case, I'd consider:

1.replacing the main panel you have with one that can supply 200A/stab

2. get a 4-stab 200A murray breaker, if there is such a thing.

3. Run two 100A lines to the house, for two 100 panels, if code/inspector allows.
 
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Old 10-03-08, 04:57 PM
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Can I install two separate 100 amp double pole breakers in the main and run them both to a single 200 amp "subpanel''? Or would these have to be run to two separate 100 amp subpanels?
 
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Old 10-04-08, 01:44 AM
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The safest way to done this set up as you are asking is run two separted sets of conductors and seprated subpanel.

The code is pretty strict with parallel cables and in this situation best to run sepreated subpanels with seperated 100 amp breakers in the main breaker box but do not put 100 amp breaker across the other 100 amp breaker in horztonal format.

Like this example

1 , 3 is one two pole 100 amp breaker while 2 , 4 is other 100A two pole breaker this set up is a big no no because it will overload the bussbar flange fingers { most breaker box bussbar flange fingers are rated useally in 125 amp range otherwise noted by manufacter }

The other methold it is much safer this way

1,3 and 5,7 or 2,4 and 6,8

or other location as long you are above or below either breaker in stack format but just watch the bending room due the size of conductors it can be little tough but it is doable

Before you do any more planning you should check with the heat pump unit in case it have back up electric heat that something you have to think about it.

Typically the electric back up heat can have much as 10~15 KW depending on the location.

let us know once you find more details about the heat pump including the back up electric heat.

That part it may change a bit of figures and the circuits layout and use of subpanels.

Merci,Marc
 
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Old 10-04-08, 11:50 AM
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Originally Posted by Don View Post
I do not know the model of load centre but can get it. I know its a Murray and has something to the effect of...."110 amps per branch circuit bus stab".
Sounds like his panel is rated at 110 amps per stab.

If you are going that much electric you should maybe talk to your power Co. and see if they have any Off peak options. You could maybe have one panel for the off peak and one for all the other loads. Could save you a ton of money since off peak is about half per KWH.
 
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