Romex in Plastic conduit?


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Old 10-27-08, 09:46 AM
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Romex in Plastic conduit?

I have kind of an odd situation that I haven't been able to find any applicable information on.

When I bought my house, my inspector said I would need to put a section of wire in a conduit. Right now there is romex coming out of a metal box, that goes up a cinder block wall and then across the ceiling (unfinished laundry room). He said I would need to put a conduit over the romex as it goes up the cinder block wall, and I as recall, he said to just use plastic conduit.

In a book my Dad had given me (Black and Decker Home Wiring), it specifically says not to connect plastic conduit to a metal box. I have looked through the NEC, and I can't find anything along that line... I also know romex shouldn't go in a conduit, but this is for a short distance, and I would need this to be romex once it clears the 5' section up the wall...

I have pictures of it, just don't have my server up to be able to publish them yet, but I can email if that helps.

Thank You!
 
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Old 10-27-08, 10:28 AM
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Originally Posted by ande3171 View Post

In a book my Dad had given me (Black and Decker Home Wiring), it specifically says not to connect plastic conduit to a metal box.
With a metal conduit I see this frequently. You just put a bushing on top where the romex comes out. The toughest thing about that setup is trying to make an offset bend without an offset bender.

With plastic you would do the same thing. The Black and Decker book might assume that the metal box is part of the ground path, and that if you use plastic you would break the ground. However you can just run a separate ground wire in the conduit. Except for local code restrictions and some places where plastic would be a bad idea for other reasons, I am not aware of another reason you could not use plastic conduit with a metal box. I've got quite a few of those situations.
 
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Old 10-27-08, 10:39 AM
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I would like to hear the Code article quoted that your current setup violates. Sounds like a home inspector.

You can use PVC or metallic conduits to sleeve the NM cable. Do not strip off the jacket from the NM once it enters the sleeve. The jacket should extend at least 1/4" into the box. A bushing or fitting should be used to protect the jacket from chafing.
 
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Old 10-27-08, 10:41 AM
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Plastic conduit for protection of romex up the concrete wall is okay, even with a metal box. The book you looked at was probably talking about conduit as a raceway (fully contained enclosure for wiring) whereas in this situation the conduit is only used for protection from physical damage for a short spot. You could just as easily provide protection by running the cable alongside a 2x4 or finishing the wall with drywall or paneling.
 
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Old 10-27-08, 12:24 PM
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Thanks for all the help.

I don't know the specific section of the NEC, but I thought you needed to provide protection for cables (this was a housing inspector, not an electrical inspector).

I'd just finish the section, but there is a old style concrete sink there up against the wall, and all the plumbing would be in the way. I'd rather not risk making this situation any worse...


Thanks again for all the help!
 
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Old 10-29-08, 11:21 AM
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I was expecting this thread to be about putting romex in conduit. I'm reasobably sure that you are either not supposed to do that, or otherwise it's a poor practive. Conduit is for stranded wire.
 
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Old 10-29-08, 11:45 PM
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Icondude,
In this case it would just be a sleeve on the wall stubbed at the ceiling to protect the romex from damage. Actually it's good common sense to protect the cable, especially since it's near a sink and plumbing. As ibpooks said, either by sleeving it, running it next to a 2x4, or inside a finished wall. Wiremold is another option.
 
 

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