Weatherproof box under eave?

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Old 11-05-08, 12:49 PM
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Weatherproof box under eave?

Hello everyone,
I'm going to install boxes under the eave for yard floodlights. Can anyone advise if I have to use a weatherproof box or can I use a standard metal box. It would be much easier to use a standard metal box with side mount so I can simply mount it to the side of the rafter. I have not found a weather proof box with side mount so if I have to use a weatherproof box I will have to put in a cross brace between the rafters for the box. Doing this is not only time consuming it will also hinder soffit venting.
If it has to be a weather proof box can you advise the section of the NEC.
Thanks
Gary
 
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Old 11-05-08, 01:09 PM
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Please see NEC 314.15.
Doug
 
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Old 11-05-08, 01:18 PM
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Thanks for the reply Doug,
Now I'm looking for info based on your expertise and experience. Is this location (under eave) considered a wet location? If not my interpretation of 314.15 is that a weatherproof box is not necessary because it will be under the eave, away from weather and facing downward.
Please advise if I'm off base here.
Thanks
Gary
 
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Old 11-05-08, 02:08 PM
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Is it possible to have the outlet box recessed in the eaves or is surface mount the only way it can be done?
 
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Old 11-05-08, 02:47 PM
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Although under the eave may not be considered a wet location until it comes a big blow, it is considered a damp location.



From the National Electric Code


Damp Location:



Locations protected from weather and not subject to


saturation with water or other liquids but subject to moderate degrees of moisture. Examples of such locations include partially protected locations under canopies, marquees, roofed pen porches, and like locations, and interior locations subject to moderated degrees of moisture, such as basements, some barns, and some cold storage buildings.



Conduit Bodies in Damp and Wet Locations
NEC 314.15(A) provides the requirements for conduit bodies installed in damp and wet locations. Although gasketed covers are generally provided for use with conduit bodies, this does not necessarily mean that all conduit bodies are suitable for use in damp or wet locations. Listed conduit bodies are required to be marked “For use in wet locations” or “Wet locations” where determined by test to be suitable for this application. Field assemblies of conduit bodies with listed conduit or cable fittings threaded into conduit body hubs have not typically been evaluated for use in wet locations as part of their listing. Conduit and cable fittings listed and marked for use in wet locations, similarly have not typically been listed for such use when field assembled into the threaded hubs of a conduit body.

Conduit Body Covers
All conduit bodies are required to be provided with compatible covers that are suitable for the conditions of use. Because of industry standardization, covers are not always shipped from the factory with assemblies that include covers and/or gaskets. In dry locations, the covers and conduit bodies of different manufacturers are generally interchangeable. For wet locations, however, a conduit body and a cover specified by the listed manufacturer is required to be used.

 
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Old 11-05-08, 03:20 PM
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I may be misunderstanding your goal, so if my answer doesn't make sense, feel free to skip over it.

If the box is mounted within the eve (flush mounted like a box would be in a wall), you can use a regular metal or plastic box with an outdoor cover on it.

If the box will be exposed, I would suggest using an outdoor box regardless because over time a metal box will rust even if just exposed to the humidity outdoors. I'm sure you can mount the box by screwing it to an existing rafter without any special framing.

Also, maybe a picture would help explain your problem better.
 
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Old 11-06-08, 07:58 AM
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Thanks for the replies,
The boxes will be recessed in the soffit, not surface mounted. I would prefer to use an outdoor box but can't find one with a side mount. After you guys clarified things for me I will use a standard metal box only because of the ease of installation.

Thanks
Gary
 
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Old 11-06-08, 08:14 AM
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Recessed in the soffit is a dry location. Regular boxes is fine.
 
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Old 11-06-08, 09:55 AM
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Originally Posted by zoom38 View Post
Thanks for the replies,
The boxes will be recessed in the soffit, not surface mounted. I would prefer to use an outdoor box but can't find one with a side mount. After you guys clarified things for me I will use a standard metal box only because of the ease of installation.

Buy plastic round old work boxes, a hole saw and recess them. Then you can use romex and you don't have to ground the box. Make sure the floodlight fixture is rated for outdoor use.
 
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Old 11-06-08, 10:18 AM
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Originally Posted by thinman View Post
Buy plastic round old work boxes, a hole saw and recess them. Then you can use romex and you don't have to ground the box. Make sure the floodlight fixture is rated for outdoor use.

I would not want the weight of the fixture causing the vinyl soffit to sag.
 
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Old 11-06-08, 10:52 AM
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Originally Posted by pcboss View Post
I would not want the weight of the fixture causing the vinyl soffit to sag.

He never said what material is. Also, it doesn't sound like this is a remodel job anyway since he is attaching the box to the rafters. I agree with using plastic (nail on) boxes though.
 
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Old 11-06-08, 11:14 AM
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Originally Posted by Tolyn Ironhand View Post
Also, it doesn't sound like this is a remodel job anyway since he is attaching the box to the rafters. I agree with using plastic (nail on) boxes though.
Good point! I assumed it is a remodel.
 
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