running cirucit to shed

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Old 11-13-08, 07:11 PM
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running cirucit to shed

Building a new shed in the backyard and want to pull power into it for general purpose outlets. Planning on a 20 amp circuit, all wiring will be rigid conduit outside, and thinwall in my house till i get outside

The run will be roughly 75 feet, and I want to put in a 20amp circuit, what size do I need will 12 ga be inadequate due to the distance, do i need a dedicated ground

Thanks again
 
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Old 11-13-08, 07:54 PM
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For 75', 12ga will be fine. You should use either 12/2 UF (which includes a ground) or 3 conductors of THWN (black, white, green).

Since you're running the wire/conduit anyway, many people would suggest running 12/3 or 4 individual wires as a multi-wire branch circuit (MWBC) and a 2-pole 20A breaker. This will give you two 20A circuits at the shed for only minimal additional cost.

Don't forget, whatever you decide to do, you need a disconnect at the shed. This could be as simple as a switch where the feeder enters the structure.
 
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Old 11-13-08, 09:15 PM
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Keep in mind that whatever you run now cannot be supplemented later. This is one of those situations where you need to anticipate all your future needs and guess correctly the first time. So plan carefully everything electrical that will ever be used in that shed. And some things might use more power than you think, so check the power requirements of what you plan to use. Don't plan to run a table saw out there if you also plan to keep the beer cold, not on one 20-amp circuit anyway.
 
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Old 11-13-08, 09:29 PM
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For just about the same amount of energy it would take to run underground rated wire, you could run 3/4 or 1 pvc pipe between the house and shed. That allows for circuit expansion later and helps to prevent possible damage to UF cable as the years wear on.
 
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Old 11-14-08, 09:31 AM
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deff running conduit as code requires it. i just did a jacuzzi all conduit and had to pull a dedicated ground

does the shed require a dedicated ground also
 
  #6  
Old 11-14-08, 10:13 AM
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The NEC requires conduit and an insulated ground to hot tubs and jacuzzis due to the mixture of people, water, and electricity. The NEC does not require conduit to other structures, though it is possible that your local code amendments do require it.

Even if not required, it may still be a good idea for protection and future expansion. Regardless, you'll need a ground wire (hot/neutral/ground), but it does not specifically need to be insulated like when wiring your jacuzzi.
 
 

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