Dedicated Circuit?


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Old 11-16-08, 06:00 PM
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Dedicated Circuit?

Hello, I have two issues working that I'd like to get some input on. One issue has to do with having a kiln that requires a dedicated 110 circuit and the other has to do with a terminated household wiring to a receptacle that had been removed years earlier. The removed receptacle was on the wooden flankings of a sucken living room and extended out from the condo's living room walls, within the wooden footings that formed the drop down within the concrete.
My question is....can these two issues be combined so that the dedicated circuit is now on one one of the removed receptacle's lines? And how would I find out if this line had other branches other than the terminus that the removed receptacle was.
Perfectly confused? Me too. I need to be able to ask an electrician about this and don't know where to start for an estimate.
 
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Old 11-16-08, 07:08 PM
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I doubt you could use an old outlet wire for a kiln. I imagine they would use a lot of electricity and require a larger size of wire? I don't know though...

Do you know how many watts your kiln is?
 
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Old 11-17-08, 06:07 AM
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Commonly residential wiring is run in a daisy chained fashion. That means that unless the receptacle in the drop down was already a dedicated circuit it would have wires leading out to other parts of the old circuit that fed it.

Just tell the electrician you need a dedicated circuit along with the voltage and ampacity needed as well as where you would like it installed.
 
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Old 11-17-08, 07:55 AM
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The kiln runs off a 110 line, I know that.
 
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Old 11-17-08, 09:09 AM
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The kiln should have a label on it - many times on the back which will say watts.

Or a manufacturer name and model number and you can call the manufacturer or look it up on the internet.

Anyway the electrician will need to know this so he can install the correct size wire and breaker. Also he will need to know what type of plug it has if it is different from a standard plug.
 
 

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