Help, if possible?


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Old 11-16-08, 08:56 PM
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Help, if possible?

If possible could someone tell me how to wire these lights to one switch and possibly run off a 6V or 12 V battery? Using magnetic LED's in a goose pit and need to find out how to wire these to run off one switch. The diagram linked together is how the original is wired. Thanks for any help.
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Old 11-16-08, 09:37 PM
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Forgive me for probably asking something obvious (I get the complex stuff, but have trouble with the basics sometimes...), but what is a "magnetic LED"? What is a "goose pit"?
 
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Old 11-17-08, 03:47 AM
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I don't see current limiting resistors in the circuit ... but here's how you'd switch all three:

 
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Old 11-17-08, 06:04 AM
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You are showing a "standard switch with light" in your diagram, yet battery power?? What are you trying to light? Three single LED's won't provide much room light, and batteries won't power a LED light bulb.

More details please, and ditto on Bill's questions, I got to hear what a goose pit is.
Bud
 
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Old 11-17-08, 07:03 AM
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I am not sure about the battery powered lights but I can tell you what a goose pit is!
A goose pit is a hole in the ground that has a cover over it (either wood or cloth) that is used to hide from the geese while hunting them. Usually in a field with many decoy geese around it. It is somewhat like a deer stand. Some at hunting clubs are made of concrete or fiberglass and stay all year round. Although only used during goose hunting season. Others are dug before the season starts and filled back in at the end of the season so the field can be used to grow crops.
That said you must realize that the geese are not hunted at night but you have to get into the field before daylight so you are under cover in the pit before the geese arrive. I am thinking the poster wants these lights to be on 1 switch to limit the movement it takes to turn them off. As with deer too much movement scares the game.
I know there are battery power LED lights. I am not sure if the suggestion on wiring them would triple the voltage to them or if the lights can take more than the 3 AAA batteries.
I also think the battery pack may already be on the light along with a switch. Sort of a self contained battery light. I think the poster wants to place the lights around the pit (inside) but have only one switrch to turn them on or off.
 
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Old 11-17-08, 10:30 AM
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[QUOTE=badeyeben;

Yes, kinda. Our goose pit is a steel holding tank underground. The magnetic LED lights have 25 led on them, and look like a hockey put with a magnet on the back and a push button switch. When you take tehm apart you find 3 AAA batteries powering them. I am looking to place these lights on top of our cylindrical steel tank to act as lights (they are quite bright) When y ou enter the pit you walk down a ladder, it is here i want the switch, just like entering a dark room i want one switch to turn on all. Also, i wanted to know if i could some how run an alternate power source to eliminate the AAA batteries so they might run longer. Thanks all for wonderful help thus far!
 
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Old 11-17-08, 03:45 PM
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Maybe if I would read ALL the posts I wouldn't have to type this. Good luck hunting!
 
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Old 11-18-08, 12:19 AM
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Originally Posted by badeyeben View Post
I know there are battery power LED lights. I am not sure if the suggestion on wiring them would triple the voltage to them or if the lights can take more than the 3 AAA batteries.
Multiple batteries wired in parallel provide the same voltage as one battery. If the LEDs can handle one battery, they can handle multiples, because they have a current-limiting resistor in series that limits the power. If the resistor was missing, the LED would be very bright for a second before it went dark forever.

That said ... The easiest way to tie all of those lights together is to remove their individual switches and string a pair of wires in their place from one to the next. Connect those two wires to a single switch and they will all turn on at the same time. Make sure you pay attention to polarity.
 
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Old 11-18-08, 08:26 AM
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That being said (that the resistor limits the current) without knowing where this resistor is, the way to use a single 6volt or 12volt battery, would be to attach wires to the terminals that the batteries are going to now?
Since probably the resistor is built into the battery pack? Attaching wires to the positive and negative of each light and running them to the negative and positive of the battery? Then if you left the switch on the light itself turned on you would just have to break the wire to the positive of the bigger battery to put in the switch?
 

Last edited by badeyeben; 11-18-08 at 08:53 AM. Reason: added last paragraph
 

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