Requirements for wiring baseboard heater


  #1  
Old 11-17-08, 10:09 AM
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Requirements for wiring baseboard heater

I am about to rewire 2 baseboard heaters. Both of them are attached on the same circuit. I am rewiring them because the idiot who wired them in the first place felt that it would be easier or cheaper to cut a hole out of the house, run the cable through steel conduit attached to the exterior brick, and then cut another hole in the attic where the cable re-enters the house. Then, he ran the cable under the floorboards over to the crawl space where they were all taped together, not even inside a junction box.

The cable is 12-2. My questions are:
1. is this the correct cable, or should I use a different gauge?
2. Do these baseboard heaters have to be on a separate circuit, or can I create a new outlet for a receptacle box off of it? I am asking this because I would like to also use this 12-2 circuit for a laundry machine. The heaters won't be running all the time, and neither will the laundry machine. So can I put them both on the same circuit?
3. The original circuit was 15A. Shouldn't you use a 20A circuit for 12-2?
4. Do I require an arc fault circuit, or a ground fault circuit, or none of the above?
 
  #2  
Old 11-17-08, 11:13 AM
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Originally Posted by doublezero View Post
run the cable through steel conduit attached to the exterior brick
As you may already know NMD "Romex" cable cannot be used on the exterior of the building, so if you re-use this conduit you'll need to use a waterproof cable like UF-B or THWN conductors for the outdoor portion.

is this the correct cable, or should I use a different gauge?
What is the wattage and voltage of the heaters? The #12/2 cable can support up to 3840W of 240V heaters or 1920W of 120V heaters.

2. Do these baseboard heaters have to be on a separate circuit, or can I create a new outlet for a receptacle box off of it? I am asking this because I would like to also use this 12-2 circuit for a laundry machine.
The heaters must be on their own circuit(s) depending on the answer to #1. The laundry must have it's own 20A circuit with #12 wire. Code is specific on both of these.

3. The original circuit was 15A. Shouldn't you use a 20A circuit for 12-2?
12/2 is good for 20A maximum, you may use it for less.

4. Do I require an arc fault circuit, or a ground fault circuit, or none of the above?
Neither unless the heater is in a bathroom, in which case please specify as there are a few more details to cover.
 
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Old 11-17-08, 11:27 AM
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I'm not planning on running it through the conduit. I'm going to run the cable behind the walls, like everything else in the house. I don't like the idea of running cable outside, along the wall. The conduit was corroded and there were holes in it. I think it's a dumb idea in the first place.

I don't know what the wattage or voltage of the heaters is - people have painted them so many times, the specs are covered in paint or else they are somewhere hidden.

Thanks for the info on the circuits. I'll run a separate one for the laundry receptacle.
 
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Old 11-17-08, 05:15 PM
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Baseboard heaters here in the US draw 250 watts per foot.
 
 

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