indoor conduit


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Old 11-20-08, 07:53 AM
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indoor conduit

I went to Home Depot to pick up blue flex conduit and the guy that works in the electrical dept. told me that plastic conduit cannot be used indoors because of the chemicals it gives off if there is a fire.

This sounded absurd to me because I certainly would not use the ENT flex conduit outside but then again I am not the pro and I think this guy is supposed to know what he is talking about since he works there.

Is he mistaken or am I wrong about this? I picked up the ENT since it was the last roll but I am holding off running it until I hear back.
Thanks
 
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Old 11-20-08, 08:04 AM
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Where exactly indoors? Between floors? Inside furnace ducts or return ducts?
 
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Old 11-20-08, 08:18 AM
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Originally Posted by palmcoast View Post
I think this guy is supposed to know what he is talking about since he works there.
I don't mean to be (too) insulting, but the home improvement store employees have no technical training beyond knowing which parts go on which shelves and even then it's iffy. Occasionally you will find a retired tradesman or tradesman working a second job there, but for the most part, no expertise, and in an effort to be "helpful" they will say anything except, "I don't know."

Is he mistaken or am I wrong about this?
Based on the National code, ENT is allowed everywhere that romex is allowed plus inside concrete. Inside walls, ceilings, attics, etc; exposed or concealed; the only restrictions that I'm aware of are that ENT cannot be used in air handling spaces such as the inside of furnace ducts or cold returns due to the smoke issue or where it will be exposed to physical damage.

You could have a local code amendment or a more restrictive building code which prohibits its use, but I don't think that's a very common thing. As far as I know, the only places that require all metal conduits in residences are Chicago and NYC.
 
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Old 11-20-08, 08:19 AM
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In a basement above a drop ceiling, then up an interior wall to an unfinished attic
 
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Old 11-20-08, 10:41 AM
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Thank you Ben. I will proceed as planned
 
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Old 11-20-08, 08:27 PM
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The only thing about the ENT is the fill you have to becarefull with numbers of conductors can be run inside of them and also you will need a very fexibale fishtape to guide the conductors in smooth.

Merci,Marc
 
 

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