Wiring a 2nd electrical panel

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Old 12-17-08, 10:57 AM
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Wiring a 2nd electrical panel

I am finishing off my basement and started the wiring and ran out of open breakers on my electrical panel. How hard is it to bring power to a second electrical panel?

Thanks,

Ryan
 
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Old 12-17-08, 11:06 AM
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Installing a subpanel is one option for more circuits. Another much less expensive option would be to investigate the use of tandem (a.k.a. skinny, twinner) breakers if your panel supports them. Tandem breakers can power two circuits from one breaker slot. Could you let us know the make, model and approximate age of your panel so we can determine if your panel can handle tandems?
 
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Old 12-17-08, 11:21 AM
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Originally Posted by RyanRyan View Post
I am finishing off my basement and started the wiring and ran out of open breakers on my electrical panel. How hard is it to bring power to a second electrical panel?

Thanks,

Ryan

A second panel is about as hard as any other 220V connection in your current panel. You will need to use up the space of 2 breakers in the current panel to power the sub-panel. You then run a properly sized wire from those two breaker points to the new sub panel then run your new circuits to it.

The wire supplying the sub panel will need to be large enough to cover ALL the circuits in the sub. Often local code will dictate the size and connection of this wire. also the breaker used to supply the panel must be sized appropriately.

In my home I have a sub panel that powers some new circuits in the kitchen. It is fed by a dual 30 amp breaker from the main and has only a couple of 15A circuits connected to it. I believe we used a 8 GA wire to feed it.
 
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Old 12-17-08, 11:52 AM
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The panel is a cutler Hammer and I believe it is a 200 amp. The panel is about three years old. I will have to let you know later what the model is.

Thanks for the help.


Ryan
 
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Old 12-17-08, 12:30 PM
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[QUOTE=viennatech;1483980]A second panel is about as hard as any other 220V connection in your current panel. You will need to use up the space of 2 breakers in the current panel to power the sub-panel. You then run a properly sized wire from those two breaker points to the new sub panel then run your new circuits to it.

The wire supplying the sub panel will need to be large enough to cover ALL the circuits in the sub. Often local code will dictate the size and connection of this wire. also the breaker used to supply the panel must be sized appropriately.

I plan on hooking a electric stove, various outlets and lights to the panel. Is there a formula to determine what size wire and breaker to use when wiring the panel to the sub panel?

Thanks,

Ryan
 
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Old 12-17-08, 12:39 PM
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It's best to run high-demand appliances, such as an electric stove, directly off the main panel. Run lighting and receptacle circuits off the subpanel.
 
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Old 12-17-08, 12:49 PM
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Originally Posted by John Nelson View Post
It's best to run high-demand appliances, such as an electric stove, directly off the main panel. Run lighting and receptacle circuits off the subpanel.
I will do that. I can move a couple of circuits breakers from the main panel to the subpanel and wire the stove directly to the main panel.

Thanks,
 
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Old 12-17-08, 12:58 PM
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If you are running a 200 amp aluminum SER cable, it can be like wrestling with an alligator!

Anything smaller than that or copper is somewhat easier to manage.
 
 

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