Adding grounded receptacle to two wires. Pics included

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Old 02-07-09, 11:34 AM
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Adding grounded receptacle to two wires. Pics included

Pictures of the work space: Wiring pictures by jbueno85 - Photobucket

Over our range/stove we previously had a range hood that was wired to our electric system. My parents decided to get an over the range microwave and I am trying to figure out a way of powering the microwave with the wires that are now sticking out of the wall. My concern is that there are only two wires and the microwave needs to be connected to a 3 prong outlet. I want to make sure that it is properly grounded especially since the microwave is stainless steel. Any suggestions on how I can make sure that the grounding is correct. I have included a picture of a receptacle that was purchased. Are the metal skin on the wires usually grounded? Maybe i can connect a wire from the ground on the receptacle to the metal wiring box. Let me know what you guys think.
 
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Old 02-07-09, 12:07 PM
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Your best solution is to abandon the existing cable and run a new 12-2/g from the main panel.

Is the cable "cloth" covered?

You have checked there is not a ground wire broken off at the cable sheath?

You said metal box but I see no box. Metal box must be grounded to be of any use for a ground. Just on the outside chance it is check from black to metal box for voltage. Use a test light or analog, not digital, multimeter. Do not use a non-contact tester.

Is the existing cable the only thing on the circuit?

Is the breaker 15 amp?

What is the amp rating for the new microwave?
 
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Old 02-07-09, 01:35 PM
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If it helps, the house is fairly new, it was built about 4-5 yrs ago and it is energy star certified. Maybe that helps those familiar with the wiring codes.

I took another look at the cable, i did not see a broken ground wire. Inside the metal skin are the two wires that appear to be covered in brown paperlike material and a thin metal (silver colored) wire which i assume is there to allow the cable to hold its shape when you bend it.

The metal box that I was referring to was one that was purchased for the receptacle. There currently isn't a wire box in the wall. The only tester i have is a digital multimeter, i used it to measure the voltage from the black hot leg to the metal sheet and i was getting about 124 V. I was doing this while i was trying to find the breaker that feeds that cable, it turned out to be one that also supplies our stove and some of our outlets. The breaker is 15 amps.

The amp rating for the new microwave is 14.5 amps.

I added 2 more pictures to the link above, one includes a far picture that shows where the sub-panel is and the workspace.
 
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Old 02-07-09, 02:05 PM
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I think i may have answered my own question. I pulled out one of the receptacles on the counter of the kitchen and look at how that may have been wired. I found that they are using the same cable that is sticking out of the wall and that there is no ground connection on the 3 prong receptacle therefore i can probably add this new receptacle the same way. Can anyone think of why that receptacle was wired the way it was???
 
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Old 02-07-09, 02:30 PM
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I took another look at the cable, i did not see a broken ground wire. Inside the metal skin are the two wires that appear to be covered in brown paperlike material and a thin metal (silver colored) wire which i assume is there to allow the cable to hold its shape when you bend it.
With armored cable that has a metal bonding wire (the thin wire you saw )so long as it is intact to the breaker box it will provide the grounding. However you can't use this circuit.
it turned out to be one that also supplies our stove and some of our outlets. The breaker is 15 amps.... The amp rating for the new microwave is 14.5 amps.
You will need to run a new dedicated 20a circuit for the microwave. Since the builder used AC or MC cable your local code may not permit Romex (NM) cable.
 
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