Sub Panel Help !

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Old 02-11-09, 11:56 AM
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Sub Panel Help !

I replaced a sub panel with the exact same panel as before, which was installed by an elextrican.
First panel was damaged by a storm.

Its a GE 125 Amp external panel w/out ground block.
Its connected to the main via a dual pole 60 amp breaker
I hv installed four 15 amp breakers which are working fine.
The one 20 amp outlet i installed is not working, I hv replaced the outlet, breaker, and wiring. Still not working.

Is there something i am missing ?
Is the 20 amp breaker need to be installed first on the block followed by the lower Amp breakers ?
Stumped here !

Thanks
Sean
 
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Old 02-11-09, 04:26 PM
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Single breakers don't care where they are located, will work on either side in any position. Double breakers(240V), don't really care where they are located, they span both lines. Tandem breakers will not supply 240V. My guess is the breaker is not fully seated on the buss bar. With the breaker on, no wire connected, you should neasure 120V from the breaker hot to neutral.

A sub-panel must have a separate ground and neutral from the main panel, and the ground and neutral in the sub-panel must be separated. Only the ground buss is truly grounded at the sub-panel.
 
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Old 02-11-09, 05:44 PM
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As unlikely as it may seem if you put the wire in the breaker after the breaker was installed it is possible on GE breakers for the wire to appear to be in the hole when it is really behind it. A sharp tug on the wire should tell you if it is in the connection hole. (Yes, been there done that. Was embarrassed as all get out too.)
 
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Old 02-12-09, 09:24 AM
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Originally Posted by Just Bill View Post
Single breakers don't care where they are located, will work on either side in any position. Double breakers(240V), don't really care where they are located, they span both lines. Tandem breakers will not supply 240V. My guess is the breaker is not fully seated on the buss bar. With the breaker on, no wire connected, you should neasure 120V from the breaker hot to neutral.

A sub-panel must have a separate ground and neutral from the main panel, and the ground and neutral in the sub-panel must be separated. Only the ground buss is truly grounded at the sub-panel.
When you mean separate ground ? does that mean i need to run a ground wire for the sub panel from the ground buss to the 'ground' ?

I'll test the breaker w/out a wire connected. Thanks !
 
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Old 02-12-09, 09:34 AM
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Subpanels need to be fed with a 4 wire feed, 2 hots, a neutral and a ground.

The neutrals are isolated from the grounds. Most times this involves buying an add-on ground bar kit and installing it in the panel.
 
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