Circuit capacity

Reply

  #1  
Old 02-19-09, 06:27 AM
S
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Feb 2009
Posts: 2
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Circuit capacity

Can anyone tell me what the Nation Electrical Code says about the number of outlets, ceiling fans, and spot lights that can be on one circuit
 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 02-19-09, 07:15 AM
J
Member
Join Date: Sep 2000
Location: United States
Posts: 18,497
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
It is silent on the subject.
 
  #3  
Old 02-19-09, 08:05 AM
S
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Feb 2009
Posts: 2
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Would you think it is reasonable then to have 2 interior cieling fans with lights, 6 interior receptacles, 2 exterior ceiling fans, one exterior outlet, three double flood lights and 3 exterior recessed lights on one 20 amp circuit
 
  #4  
Old 02-19-09, 08:50 AM
I
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Near Lansing, Michigan
Posts: 10,944
Received 43 Votes on 41 Posts
It depends on the wattage of the lights, what the receptacles are used for, and where they are located. If the receptacles supply a kitchen, bath or laundry then the circuit is improper. A 20A circuit can supply a maximum of 2400W. Add up each of the light fixtures, subtract from 2400 and that tells you what remains for the receptacles. Figure about 80W for a ceiling fan not counting any built-in lights.

Receptacles are always a guess - a lamp might use 60W, a TV 200W or a spaceheater 1800W. You have to use judgement to determine what will probably be plugged in there to decide if an overload is likely.
 
  #5  
Old 02-19-09, 09:33 AM
J
Member
Join Date: Sep 2000
Location: United States
Posts: 18,497
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Originally Posted by swartzj View Post
Would you think it is reasonable then to have 2 interior cieling fans with lights, 6 interior receptacles, 2 exterior ceiling fans, one exterior outlet, three double flood lights and 3 exterior recessed lights on one 20 amp circuit
If I know nothing else, I would say "no," this is not reasonable. No electrician would install such a circuit.

But you do know something else. You know the information that Ben mentioned, and you can decide based on this information if your case is an exception to the rule. I would only do this if those receptacles were not used much, not used for anything heavy, and never simultaneously.

And pay attention to Ben's warning about circuits serving receptacles in bathrooms, kitchens, pantries, dining rooms and laundry areas. Do not extend these circuits.
 
  #6  
Old 02-19-09, 02:11 PM
F
Member
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: NE Wis / Paris France{ In France for now }
Posts: 4,808
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Originally Posted by swartzj View Post
Would you think it is reasonable then to have 2 interior cieling fans with lights, 6 interior receptacles, 2 exterior ceiling fans, one exterior outlet, three double flood lights and 3 exterior recessed lights on one 20 amp circuit

IMO it is not a very good arrangement set up like that.

the exterior ceiling fans required GFCI per NEC code requirement ditto with exterior receptale.
If you have GFCI receptale to deal with outdoor receptale and outdoor ceiling fan that fine.

( you have to hit the test button to verify if functioning correct and when you hit the test button the outdoor ceiling fan should not be running at all if still running that need to be addressed.)

Merci,Marc
 
Reply
Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: