GFCI outlets question


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Old 03-01-09, 08:47 PM
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GFCI outlets question

Long story short . . . Is it ok to have two GFCI's on the same circuit?

Short story long, I replaced an outlet in a bedroom that was falling out of the wall with a GFCI outlet. This outlet feeds one more outlet in the room. The wiring is fine and the downstream outlet trips when testing the GFCI.

Well, I didn't know that the beginning of the circuit is ACTUALLY in a bathroom that sits right before the bedroom.

So, I would like to install a GFCI outlet in the bathroom as well.

So, it would be:

Breaker box --> GFCI outlet --> GFCI outlet --> Protected outlet.

I would really like to avoid having the switch out the second GFCI outlet, but of course, I want to do things correctly.

I hope ya'll follow my question.

Thanks!
 

Last edited by adamt56; 03-01-09 at 09:18 PM.
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Old 03-01-09, 09:04 PM
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Best to use only one GFCI. Will assume your current setup is grandfathered so wiring is OK as is but by latest national code bedroom can not be on bathroom circuit and must be protected by AFCI breaker. Why are you putting a GFCI in the bedroom?
 
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Old 03-01-09, 09:17 PM
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Originally Posted by ray2047 View Post
Best to use only one GFCI. Will assume your current setup is grandfathered so wiring is OK as is but by latest national code bedroom can not be on bathroom circuit and must be protected by AFCI breaker. Why are you putting a GFCI in the bedroom?
It is original 1954 wiring. Yes, I've read that current code requires bathroom to be dedicated 20 amp.

I wanted to provide some additional protection in the bedoom because the outlets are not grounded & it is my 2 y/o's room.
 
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Old 03-01-09, 10:39 PM
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Why not just skip the second GFCI and put everything down stream on the first GFCI on the load side of that GFCI.

Breaker box ---> GFCI -----> Protected outlet ---> Protected outlet
 
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Old 03-01-09, 11:11 PM
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If you just use the LOAD terminals in the bathroom GFI the bedroom one will be independant and will not see the other GFI.
 
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Old 03-02-09, 06:05 AM
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Originally Posted by Tolyn Ironhand View Post
Why not just skip the second GFCI and put everything down stream on the first GFCI on the load side of that GFCI.

Breaker box ---> GFCI -----> Protected outlet ---> Protected outlet
I could but was trying to avoid switching out the GFCI that is currently in the bedroom.
 
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Old 03-02-09, 08:25 AM
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Is it ok to have two GFCI's on the same circuit?
Simple answer is yes.....
 
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Old 03-02-09, 08:56 AM
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Originally Posted by John Nelson View Post
Simple answer is yes.....
Thanks.

I just didn't want there to be interference between the two GFCI's or something . . .
 
 

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