oops! inspector failed rough-in

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Old 03-13-09, 10:34 PM
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oops! inspector failed rough-in

I had rough in inspection today. part of my addition is a dining room which is separate from main addition. since it is close to old panel, I decided to wire it to old panel instead of new subpanel. I finished wiring it and spoke with him to see if could get partial inspection so that I could finish the dining room. got red sticker that said that I needed to make all splices in the outlet boxes. I had just done search on rough in on this site and read that the romex sheath didn't even need to be stripped off. Not only does he want it stripped off, he apparently wants all the spices made up. so I just don't know how much I am supposed to have done?

for all my plastic receptacle boxes that have two wires (daisy chain) do I make ground pigtail and put wire nut on it? do I leave this outside of box or do I shove it in with just the single ground wire to receptacle hanging out? Do I have to pigtail the hot and neutral (my receptacles are more expensive ones that you can back wire (NOT the backstab) and there are slots for both sets of wires so I think I may do that instead of pigtail-thoughts on which way?

for recessed cans do I wire nut hots, neutrals, grounds and leave them hanging or do I shove them into the box?

for light fixture with metal ceiling box I hook up a ground wire to box and combine it and circuit ground with a pigtail to fixture. do they usually allow a wrap around ground screw and then use end of ground to go to fixture? anything else (I don't have the fixtures yet)

or is it really impossible to know cause every inspector may want something different?
 
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Old 03-14-09, 01:28 AM
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Originally Posted by hammerash View Post
I had rough in inspection today. part of my addition is a dining room which is separate from main addition. since it is close to old panel, I decided to wire it to old panel instead of new subpanel. I finished wiring it and spoke with him to see if could get partial inspection so that I could finish the dining room. got red sticker that said that I needed to make all splices in the outlet boxes. I had just done search on rough in on this site and read that the romex sheath didn't even need to be stripped off. Not only does he want it stripped off, he apparently wants all the spices made up. so I just don't know how much I am supposed to have done?
Most Inspectors will like to see the romex sheath removed inside the junction boxes and make sure you have ground conductor termated but not need to do the devices on yet { switches and receptales } until you get the drywall done mudded, painted etc.,, etc.,,


for all my plastic receptacle boxes that have two wires (daisy chain) do I make ground pigtail and put wire nut on it? do I leave this outside of box or do I shove it in with just the single ground wire to receptacle hanging out? Do I have to pigtail the hot and neutral (my receptacles are more expensive ones that you can back wire (NOT the backstab) and there are slots for both sets of wires so I think I may do that instead of pigtail-thoughts on which way?
If you have more than two pairs of conductors yes you must make a pigtail however ., the grounding { bare } conductors it don't matter if you have one or two or more it must be pigtailed the numbers of pigtail will depending on the number of gang of boxes itself.
If one gang you need only one pigtail if two gang box then two pigtails etc

for recessed cans do I wire nut hots, neutrals, grounds and leave them hanging or do I shove them into the box?

for light fixture with metal ceiling box I hook up a ground wire to box and combine it and circuit ground with a pigtail to fixture. do they usually allow a wrap around ground screw and then use end of ground to go to fixture? anything else (I don't have the fixtures yet)

or is it really impossible to know cause every inspector may want something different?
For the recessed can wire it all the way and close them up unless the inspector ask to open one of the recessed can junction box real quick to make sure the spices are good.

However some Inspectors are strict and some are not too bad.

The main thing is check with inspector to see what they want.
Some will tell you what they want and some will not say anything until they inspect it.

Merci,Marc
 
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Old 03-14-09, 12:47 PM
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When we call for a rough-in we will splice everything and push the wires in the boxed. So after the walls are painted all we have to do is put on devices and cover plates and turn on breakers. That is because when we are done with the rough-in and we don't come back until it is painted so everything needs to be spliced, covered and ready for the sheet rockers.
 
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Old 03-14-09, 04:47 PM
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I thought that they would want to see that I had 8" of wire from front of box but I guess they don't really care if they let you push them all into box. I have wired a lot of things before, but never had to have inspected. I think that 8" of wire is way to much and simply crowds the box, especially if you are going to have pigtails. I don't need anywhere near that amount to work comfortably. Heck, on some old boxes I have worked on I have had maybe only an inch and was able to get it done. I think about 4" is good. but I certainly don't want to cut it that short if inspector will reject that. Do you guys really leave 8"?
 
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Old 03-14-09, 04:54 PM
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I measure from the tip of index finger to the wrist. That leaves some fudge factor.
 
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Old 03-14-09, 08:36 PM
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I leave a foot. You can always cut a wire shorter but you cannot cut it longer.
 
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Old 03-14-09, 11:10 PM
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Originally Posted by hammerash View Post
I thought that they would want to see that I had 8" of wire from front of box but I guess they don't really care if they let you push them all into box. I have wired a lot of things before, but never had to have inspected. I think that 8" of wire is way to much and simply crowds the box, especially if you are going to have pigtails. I don't need anywhere near that amount to work comfortably. Heck, on some old boxes I have worked on I have had maybe only an inch and was able to get it done. I think about 4" is good. but I certainly don't want to cut it that short if inspector will reject that. Do you guys really leave 8"?

6" from where it enters the box is code (unless it changed in 08 code and I missed it). Actually, if there is too much wire, the wire count for box fill must consider this.

4" should be rejected.

bottom line, nothing visible once the rock is on should not be an issue for a rough in but what your inspector expects is generally what you have to live with. He surely shouldn;t fail a rough in if the violation is accessible and correctable after the wall is closed. I can see him telling you the problem but surely should not fail you.

you apparently have experienced one of the many jerk inspectors out there with a God complex.
 
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Old 03-14-09, 11:19 PM
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so you are saying you use a foot and then make your splices from there and shove all that in box? or you leave a foot till you know that you have everything adjusted and cable stapled in place and then cut it? I had a lot coming out of boxes till I had it pulled all tight over entire run and stapled. I now have it cut to 9". I guess I have to leave it that long. thanks
 
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Old 03-15-09, 06:33 PM
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He's saying leave a foot entering the box when you pulled the cable and cut it to 6" when you are done. Not 6" outside the box, but 6" after it enters the box. That typically leaves what.....4 1/2" outside the box?!
 
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Old 03-15-09, 09:25 PM
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Ok, that sounds like what I said when I said about 4". I was meaning 4" sticking out past the FRONT of the box. All my books say 8" past the FRONT of the box so that is why I thought that is what you need and I was just saying that seemed like a lot of wire. If code says 6" from where it enters the box (in back) than for a box about 3" deep (my 22.5 Cu In boxes) that leaves 3" sticking out past the front of the box. Correct? Sorry to keep asking but as was said-once you cut it too short, you can't get it back!
 
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Old 03-16-09, 09:54 AM
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Originally Posted by nap View Post
you apparently have experienced one of the many jerk inspectors out there with a God complex.
I think this was the case. Inspection failures should be for specific violations that must be corrected before sheetrock is installed. Having grounds made up and sheathing stripped is simply his preference.

All my books say 8" past the FRONT of the box
No, that's too much wire. Code minimum is 6" from the point of entry or 3" past the face of the box, whichever is longer. It's article 300.14 if anyone wants to look up the text.

I usually leave a bit more wire than that. I think 6" is too short for some splices, so I usually shoot for about 7-8" -- maybe a bit more in a large box like 3 gang or 4 gang switch bank where you may need to move switch positions around.
 
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Old 03-16-09, 10:04 AM
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Having the sheath stripped and the grounds made up ensures that the grounding is continous. Much easier to check instead of removing the coverplate and a device to check. A real timesaver for the inspector.
 
 

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