Halo's push-in wire connectors--as good as wire nuts?

Reply

  #1  
Old 03-17-09, 06:24 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: May 2003
Location: Suburb of Detroit
Posts: 283
Halo's push-in wire connectors--as good as wire nuts?

I have some recessed cans from Halo that come with push-in connectors (for lack of a better term). They are orange and clear and take up to four wires per connector. There's connectors for white, black, and ground. Are these reliable? They remind me of back-stab connectors on receptacles, which I know are unreliable. However, these Halo connectors don't seem to be designed to release the wire. Any thoughts on these?
 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 03-17-09, 06:30 PM
pcboss's Avatar
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: Maryland
Posts: 14,587
I have used the Ideal brand of push-in connectors without a problem. There is much more surface area than the backstabs on a device.

To remove a wire from these connectors you need to pull while twisting. They are only for 1 time use.
 
  #3  
Old 03-26-09, 09:44 AM
Member
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Texas
Posts: 2
Any of these CuAl rated?
Have a home with Cu-clad with straight Aluminum ground wires.

I'm hoping this will make interconnects with straight Copper easier...
 
  #4  
Old 03-26-09, 09:57 AM
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Near Lansing, Michigan
Posts: 10,506
No, they are not aluminum rated.

The only good AL-CU connectors that I know of are the COPALUM crimping system (only sold through contractors authorized by Amp/Tyco), and AlumiConn set-screw connectors. I don't know if the alumiconns are available at retails stores, but a supply house should be able to get them for you.
 
  #5  
Old 03-26-09, 10:10 AM
Member
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Texas
Posts: 2
Thanks, that's what I figured.
 
  #6  
Old 03-26-09, 02:49 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: May 2003
Location: Suburb of Detroit
Posts: 283
Well, now that this thread is back to life, I must say I really liked using the quick connectors from Halo. Makes life simple!
 
  #7  
Old 03-26-09, 04:28 PM
Member
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Wilmington
Posts: 4,219
The fixtures have the UL sticker, so I would have to say they are probably OK. But I am also sure that there is some local code somwhere that does not like them.
 
  #8  
Old 03-26-09, 06:38 PM
Unclediezel's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Northeastern PA.
Posts: 2,230
Originally Posted by Just Bill View Post
The fixtures have the UL sticker, so I would have to say they are probably OK. But I am also sure that there is some local code somwhere that does not like them.
On the Flip side, Installing the lights using plain wire nuts, would be deviating from design, and not in accordance with MFR's installation instructions.

Oh by the way, I clipped mine off and used them to "Shim" the drywall around the tub.
 
  #9  
Old 03-27-09, 12:17 PM
Banned. Rule And/Or Policy Violation
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: Columbus, Ohio
Posts: 239
Yea. I snip them off too. Guess I just don't like the idea of quick connects. I assume they are still spring loaded to some extent and what happens 10 years down the road when they start to wear out and loose contact?

Worse case scenario the increased resistance really heats things up, best case scenario the light just quits working...

Think you would just be going a step beyond the manufacturers recomendations by using wire nuts. Certainly shouldn't void the UL listing.
 
  #10  
Old 03-29-09, 06:06 PM
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 4,251
I've had good experiences with the Halo push in connectors. You do have to ensure that the wires are pushed all the way in. I've run into a few cans which the tinned wires coming from the light weren't pushed all the way into the connector, and pull out pretty easily.

Not a fault of the connector, but something to double check when wiring them up.
 
  #11  
Old 09-04-13, 10:31 AM
Member
Join Date: May 2006
Location: Sparta, NJ
Posts: 169
I realize this is an old thread, but the question is still valid. Are these connectors safe to use ? I have 4 HALO brand lights that I will be installing and these connectors are on the wires. Do I cut them off or use them ?
 
  #12  
Old 09-04-13, 10:55 AM
Nashkat1's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: USA
Posts: 8,470
I've always just used them and never had a problem on a few hundred fixtures. Unless you make a well-twisted splice before capping it with a wire nut, using the push-in connectors is probably more reliable, IMX.
 
  #13  
Old 09-05-13, 09:24 AM
Member
Join Date: May 2006
Location: Sparta, NJ
Posts: 169
I used the supplied connectors. The wires push in easily and feel very secure in the connector. I tugged on a few and none budged.
 
  #14  
Old 09-06-13, 11:57 PM
Nashkat1's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: USA
Posts: 8,470
Thank for the update.
 
  #15  
Old 09-07-13, 05:43 AM
Member
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: USA
Posts: 3,093
It would be interesting if the next person who despises these supplied Halo connectors and snips them off would dissect one and describe to us / post some pictures showing the increased contact area compared with the backstab connectors (these are UL listed too) in receptacles and switches.

A backstab connection that I dissected some time ago had a metal contact plate about 3/32 inches wide and half an inch long just inside the hole and a single straight spring element to hold the wire against the plate. Because the wire end is typically not perfectly straight and may also be subjected to stress from the wire itself entering the hole, the wire end may contact the plate only at one or two tiny points. (The spring element adds another contact point.) I do suspect that when the circuit is first used, the tiny contact points get very hot and the wire spot welds itself to the plate. This improves the connection and things cool down. Should vibration occur such as from forceful pulling out of a plug from the receptacle or a heavy truck rumbling down the street outside, the spot weld breaks and may be reformed at a later date.
 
  #16  
Old 09-07-13, 05:57 AM
chandler's Avatar
Banned. Rule And/Or Policy Violation
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 39,968
I doubt there is any "welding" taking place in backstabs. Of the thousands I have either removed from service or removed the wires to the screws, none showed any signs of being welded. I like the push connectors, and have never had a concern nor a call back due to a flickering light or failure. I think we are comparing apples and oranges here. In addition, back stabs are limited to 14 gauge wiring, making it a moot point on a 20 amp circuit, whereas the push connectors are made for larger wires.
 
  #17  
Old 09-07-13, 06:54 AM
Member
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 1,174
Backstab recepts are UL approved, so there is not much going there for confidence.
OTOH, how much current does one expect with a single Halo? 0.5 amps? And that is if you are using incandescents. I would tend not to rely on the push-ins to supply a row of over a dozen lamps, but that's me, not the rules. I do use them for the purpose intended, but spring brass clips asked to supply 10 amps for 20 years is asking for trouble, no matter the name on the device.
 
Reply

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Display Modes