need wire nut for 7 #14 ground wires?

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Old 03-17-09, 11:35 PM
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need wire nut for 7 #14 ground wires?

I have a surface mount steel box that will have 2 switches for lights and also will have unswitched power running to another box. I wanted a lot of room so I went with a box where the switches mount to the cover as this gives an extra 7 cu in.

so I have ground wires as follows:

1. from panel
2. unswitched pass through
3. to light 1
4. to light 2
5. box ground
6. switch 1
7. switch 2

If I read things right, the switches need grounds because they mount to the cover. If they mounted to box, they would not. my wire nuts can only take 6 #14. I went online at Ideal website and didn't see any that will take 7. do they have them? Is 7 too many and if so, what options do I have. Hate to switch boxes at this point as wires are already in. don't really want to use one of those switches that is actually two switches as one switch was going to be illuminated.
 
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Old 03-18-09, 05:50 AM
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You won't need a separate "box ground". Just loop one of the grounding wires around the grounding screw and allow it to continue to the bundle. That leaves an even 6. You could combine the grounding wire to the two switches as one wire, jumping from one switch to the next without using a separate wire. Now we're down to 5. Help any?
 
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Old 03-18-09, 06:52 AM
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When I rewired my house and had say 2 or 3 grounding wire, I would cut 2 of them to be about and inch or two shorter, take a pair of pliers or needle nose and twist them together, then take the one long ground I have left and hook it up to the screw. Makes it harder to bend but it worked.
 
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Old 03-18-09, 08:40 AM
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I'm not aware of any requirement that all of the ground wires to be connected under the same wire nut, all that is required is that all of the grounds are connected together in the box. Bundle four of your grounds together with a pigtail, then connect that pigtail to the other three.
 
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Old 03-18-09, 09:15 AM
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Arnie's method is acceptable. You can also use a separate grounding screw and pigtail from the box to each switch. Or use a barrel crimp connector. Or use some of those new Ideal push-in connectors -- I think they make them up to 8 wires.
 
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Old 03-19-09, 12:19 AM
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thank you. problem solved. I just ran an extra long one to get both switches. I should have wrapped the ground from incoming power cable around the ground screw and then continued it to the splice, but I wasn't exactly sure if this was OK. Seemed fine, but since the inspector already failed I figured I better check. Good to know that you can have two ground pigtails if needed.

speaking of push on connectors, some of my recessed lights have these and some bought nearly the same time do not. They have holes for 4 wires and the black fixture wire is pushed into one of the holes leaving 3 more for the power and two other connections. and the white is pushed into one as well. ARe these Good? I think of all the bad remarks about backstabbing receptacles and I thought this would be same sort of thing?
 
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Old 03-19-09, 06:05 AM
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The ones used in the can lighting as well as the similar ones in the bags, are great for quick connections. Their design is alot better than the pushback or stab back designs you are referring to. I use them all the time as well as bcaps. Just depends on the situation.
 
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Old 03-19-09, 09:21 AM
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Originally Posted by hammerash View Post
ARe these Good? I think of all the bad remarks about backstabbing receptacles and I thought this would be same sort of thing?
In my opinion they're good -- I haven't seen one fail yet. The mechanism seems to be much improved over the receptacle stabs.
 
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Old 03-19-09, 04:05 PM
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Originally Posted by diyplank View Post
When I rewired my house and had say 2 or 3 grounding wire, I would cut 2 of them to be about and inch or two shorter, take a pair of pliers or needle nose and twist them together, then take the one long ground I have left and hook it up to the screw. Makes it harder to bend but it worked.
Note, without a mechanical means to secure this method of splicing it is not acceptable.

The use of the above method is similar to using the green ground wire nuts with the hole in the end. The wire cap provides the mechanical connection and is an approved method.
 
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