Is a non-brass grounding clamp on copper pipe okay?

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Old 03-29-09, 06:54 PM
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Is a non-brass grounding clamp on copper pipe okay?

I noticed that the Dish Network technician used a grounding clamp that isn't brass. Maybe it's aluminum? Is this okay or will it corrode the pipe eventually? Thanks!

 
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Old 03-29-09, 07:08 PM
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I have never seen an issue with those clamps.

The location of the bonding is incorrect and should be on the main grounding conductor. The water pipe should not be used as the conductor.
 
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Old 03-29-09, 07:48 PM
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It looks like milled aluminum, but is it possible that it's tinned brass?
 
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Old 03-29-09, 10:03 PM
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Originally Posted by pcboss View Post
The location of the bonding is incorrect and should be on the main grounding conductor. The water pipe should not be used as the conductor.
You lost me there! Can you please explain this a little more?
 
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Old 03-29-09, 11:18 PM
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The most Basic purpose of a "GROUND" is a "Lightning Arrestor". All forms of electricity seek the shortest path( or path of least resistance) to Ground. You WANT to give it a path out of the house , touching the LEAST amount of your stuff as possible.

In most cases a "COLD WATER" pipe is used, simply because in most cases it is buried in the earth until it hits your buildings "ENTRY POINT".....There is usually a Clamp in very close proximity to the point off entry...

In your pic,that length of Your water pipe is going to be used to complete the circuit, which is a "NO-NO". In theory, if the resistance thru the water in that pipe were less than that to "Ground" , the fault would travel to the first water fixture it could find. The closer your "Bond point" is to actual "DIRT", the less resistance the fault has to pass thru.

That green wire should run to the clamp near your water meter, or the "Ground Rod" Outside the building.
 
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Old 03-30-09, 12:26 AM
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That clamp is ok to me however the location is not correct.

I know you will say what the heck ??

Bear with me let me get a detail or two in here as the OP did have copper tubing inside his resdentail building however the reason why I say wrong location now supposed if someone did replace a section of plumming pipes from copper to plastic then you do loose the bonding format.

That why this is pretty crictal to get the bond in proper location only before city water meter only if have 10 feet { 3.1 Meter } length of copper pipe in the ground if you have short copper pipe less than the legth as I mention there then the answer is no it is not legit set up.

Most places I did see they are slowing going away from the water pipe to ground rod or demark termation box for all the various uilites like phone , cable , etc to use #6 [ 4.0mm˛] conductor size.

Merci,Marc
 
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Old 03-30-09, 09:59 AM
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Thanks for the clarification, guys.

Here is a picture of my meter. The water from the city comes out of the basement floor into the meter, and then up and out to various locations in my house.

It sounds like I need to remove the clamp in my original post and run a longer bare or green insulated conductor from the Dish switch to my water meter. Do I connect this new conductor to one of the clamps around my meter? The clamp before the meter on the right? Or do I need to put a new clamp on this pipe for the new grounding conductor? I'm not sure there's room for another clamp with all of those fitting being so close to each other.

Oh, also, what gauge conductor should I use? I would estimate the length of wire needs to be 50-60 feet long.

Thanks for the help!

 
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Old 03-30-09, 10:58 AM
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Are we bonding the lead in cable block?

For lead in (RG6, etc) bonding, 10AWG copper is the minimum size required. Per the previous posters, YES, you do want to run this all the way, using bare or green insulation, to your water meter. That IS the Grounding conductor to your electrical panel shown, correct?
What you will be doing is called a single point ground, and this tends to minimize lightning caused damage to your electronics. It is best if your phone is also bonded to this spot as well.
 
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Old 03-30-09, 11:15 AM
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Yep, the conductor attached to the meter goes up to the service panel.

So I need 10 gauge conductor, but am I connecting it to one of the clamps by the meter, or reusing the clamp that is currently in the wrong spot?

Also, what does the NEC about securing the 10 gauge conductor to the framing in my basement? I'm going to run it along the ceiling. By the way, the run is actually 75 feet. Will 10 gauge still work for that distance?
 

Last edited by jumpyg; 03-30-09 at 11:52 AM.
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Old 03-30-09, 12:16 PM
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Originally Posted by jumpyg View Post
reusing the clamp that is currently in the wrong spot?

Also, what does the NEC about securing the 10 gauge conductor to the framing in my basement?

Will 10 gauge still work for that distance?
Yes.

Use any type of cable staples.

Yes.
 
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Old 03-31-09, 06:38 PM
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You could use a split bolt connector to attach the #10 to the jumper around the meter.

The wire screws on the clamps are only for one wire.
 
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