No power at reset breaker

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  #1  
Old 04-01-09, 05:29 PM
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No power at reset breaker

I'm grounding a receptacle using a ground from another circuit. (safe , but doesn't meet code) I turned off both breakers, ran the ground, and added it to the ungrounded receptacle. I turned on the circuit breakers and the one for the newly grounded circuit didn't power the receptacle or the lights on that circuit. The whole circuit was dead. I turned off the breaker a couple of times and nothing happened. Finally, I disconnected the receptacle that I had just grounded, turned the power on, and the receptacle was hot and the lights worked.

Can a breaker have an intermittent problem such that on occasion there is no power to the circuit even though it is on?

Thanks,

Mikeyg
 
  #2  
Old 04-01-09, 06:44 PM
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Finally, I disconnected the receptacle that I had just grounded, turned the power on, and the receptacle was hot and the lights worked.

Can a breaker have an intermittent problem such that on occasion there is no power to the circuit even though it is on?
Maybe intermittent problem with breaker but more likely the original connection at the receptacle. Reconnect the receptacle again, do not install in box and try it. You weren't using back-stab connections were you?
 
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Old 04-01-09, 06:49 PM
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Finally, I disconnected the receptacle that I had just grounded, turned the power on, and the receptacle was hot and the lights worked.

Can a breaker have an intermittent problem such that on occasion there is no power to the circuit even though it is on?
Maybe intermittent problem with breaker but more likely the original connection at the receptacle. Reconnect the receptacle again and try it. You weren't using back-stab connections were you?
 
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Old 04-01-09, 06:57 PM
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safe , but doesn't meet code
No such thing, but lucky for you, you are incorrect about it not meeting code.
 
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Old 04-02-09, 11:17 AM
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Originally Posted by John Nelson View Post
No such thing, but lucky for you, you are incorrect about it not meeting code.
Isn't there something in the code about all of the conductors have to be in the same cable?
 
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Old 04-02-09, 12:10 PM
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Originally Posted by bobbsledd View Post
Isn't there something in the code about all of the conductors have to be in the same cable?
But the ground wire is not normally a conductor of current. It is only for clearing faults.
 
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Old 04-02-09, 12:20 PM
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Originally Posted by bobbsledd View Post
Isn't there something in the code about all of the conductors have to be in the same cable?
There is an exception that allows for this.
 
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Old 04-02-09, 08:44 PM
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Ideally, the grounding wire should run with the conductors. This allows for faster clearing of faults. But the code doesn't always demand the ideal solution.

It's a great myth that the code is unreasonable and demands things for reasons other than safety. The code is based on safety and nothing but safety. If you think the code is unreasonable, it's only because it is protecting you from some hazard that is not apparent to you. That's the value of the code. If all hazards were obvious, we probably wouldn't need the code.
 
 

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