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220v GFCI circuit breaker - possible unbalanced leg problem?

220v GFCI circuit breaker - possible unbalanced leg problem?

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  #1  
Old 04-08-09, 10:32 AM
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220v GFCI circuit breaker - possible unbalanced leg problem?

I'm upgrading a smoked 110V pool pump motor to a 2-speed 220v unit. I planned to put a 220v 30A GFCI breaker in to support the new 1 HP motor and the following...

I also have an area light that runs off the existing 110v circuit that currently feeds the pump that I plan on running off one leg of the same 220v I'll run to the new motor. And, I'll move a 110v GFCI outlet located at the pump to the other leg.

Will running the area light or a device on the outlet at the same time as the pump motor trip the GFCI due to an imbalance in the load on one of the 220v legs?

Thanks in advance for any insight!
 
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Old 04-08-09, 11:19 AM
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A few issues I see with your plan is that, unless the current feed to your pump was a 4 wire you won't have a neutral for the light. Is the current wiring acceptable for 30 amps? Is the light and wiring suitable for a 30 amp circuit?
 
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Old 04-08-09, 11:21 AM
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As long as your 240-volt GFCI breaker is a 120/240 breaker (i.e., the neutral circuit wire connects to the breaker itself and the breaker has a neutral pigtail wire to connect to the neutral bus), then the breaker is fine.

And the outlet does not need to be GFCI since the breaker is.

HOWEVER, the problem is that you're not allowed to connect a regular 120-volt outlet to a 30-amp breaker. The biggest you're allowed to go is 20 amps.
 
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Old 04-08-09, 01:20 PM
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I found a 20 amp 220v GFCI breaker and since the pump only draws 7 amps at high speed I feel that a 20 amp breaker will be adequate for the pump and the area light & outlet. I'll be running all #12 solid copper - 2 hots, 1 neutral (to service the 110v circuits) and 1 ground... in condiut I ran last year.

I anticipated that the existing 110v GFCI would be redundant but it's there and I don't need it elsewhere at the moment.
 
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Old 04-08-09, 01:21 PM
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Originally Posted by Fritz_75 View Post
I planned to put a 220v 30A GFCI breaker in to support the new 1 HP motor and the following...
A double-pole 20A GFCI breaker will be more than sufficient for a 1HP 240V motor (in fact a 15A would be adequate). It will also solve the problem with your general-purpose receptacle on this circuit.
 
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