GFCI questions

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Old 04-09-09, 07:10 PM
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GFCI questions

Hi all,
The way this house is wired currently (built 1957, two wire system) i understand that to add gfci outlets they will be needed throughout rather than one at the head of a given circuit to protect all other outlets downstream on that circuit.All outlets have 12AWG,and most of the circuits are controlled via a 20amp breaker a few others have a 15amp breaker that control them. Should all outlets get a 20amp gfci,
or the circuits that have a 15amp breaker get a 15amp gfci ,and 20amp breaker get 20amp gfci's?

Thank you!
 
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Old 04-09-09, 07:27 PM
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you can use one GFCI to protect whatever the device you use is designed to protect. I believe most will protect up to 5 additional receptacles.

you can also use a GFCI breaker, if one is available for your panel.

You do need to apply stickers to the recep covers with:

"GFCI protected" and " no equipment ground" on them.

15 or 20 amp?

you can put 15 amp receps on a 15 amp breaker


you can use 15 amp receps on a 20 amp breaker if there is more than one recep on that circuit.

of course you can use 20 amp receps on a 20 amp breaker

and, just in case you are proposing what it might sound like you are:

you cannot extend a branch circuit that does not have an EGC (equipment ground)
 
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Old 04-09-09, 09:03 PM
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Rules depend on location. For best advice, please fill in the "location" field of your profile.
 
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Old 04-09-09, 09:09 PM
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gfci

Thanks for the input nap. I am familiar with the stickers. Actually my other thought was to re wire to achieve an equipment ground,not extending the circuit as you assumed. Why do other receptacles on a 20amp circuit make it possible to use a 15amp gfci outlet as you mentioned? Can a 15 amp gfci outlet be used on a 20amp breaker circuit if the 15 amp gfci has a 20amp feed through?
 
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Old 04-09-09, 09:13 PM
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Rules depend on location.
 
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Old 04-09-09, 09:14 PM
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gfci

[QUOTE=John Nelson;1551411]Rules depend on location. For best advice, please fill in the "location" field of your profile.[/QUOTE The location would be Florida
 
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Old 04-09-09, 09:24 PM
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In Florida, there's no reason why you would ever need to spend the extra money on a 20-amp GFCI. Just buy the 15-amp devices and you'll be fine.

Adding or rewiring a circuit or two with a real ground is a good idea. Put priority on the circuit serving your expensive electronics. No need to do all your circuits and it would probably be cost prohibitive to do so anyway.
 
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Old 04-10-09, 07:14 AM
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gfci outlets

Thank you John nelson for your reply and looking into what the code says about this in Florida. With all outlets now having 12AWG i thought they would get 20amp gfci outlets. I am glad to find out otherwise. Well now gfci'ing all outlets in living room,bedrooms and kitchen will be a bit more inexpensive with 15amp outlets it's doable. Good thing they sell them in packages of 10. Of course the bathroom will have to be on a 20amper on it's own dedicated circuit.
 
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Old 04-10-09, 08:08 AM
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Compare the total cost of all the GFCI receptacles with the cost to get the equivalent protection with a GFCi breaker. Depending on brands and number of outlets, one or the other may be cheaper and/or less work.
 
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Old 04-10-09, 09:58 AM
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gfci

I did consider the gfci breaker route as well. The rooms i would need the gfci breaker for if tripped would shut off all outlets and lights that are in different rooms. I could see it creating a problem..( i.e. if someone else is using a light or on a computer etc. in other room or even if It was a case of someone in the bathroom and that particular circuit tripped)
Since the way things are wired now is kinda fortunate in that each outlet gets a gfci,so only that outlet is effected if trippped. Thanks again
 
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