Electrical overhaul


  #1  
Old 05-11-09, 10:41 PM
J
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Southern Michigan
Posts: 2
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Electrical overhaul

Hello all. I just purchased an old farmhouse that needs some work. The major project is updating/repairing the wiring in the home. I'm confident that I can accomplish this myself, with one caveat... I need to work one room at a time. I'm just wondering how I can wire everything down to the panel a room at a time without having to call an electrician out to re-establish connections at the panel every time. Would an electrician accept an upfront payment for repeated visits to wire the panel on room at a time? Thanks - J
 
  #2  
Old 05-12-09, 01:01 AM
ray2047's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 33,575
Received 15 Votes on 13 Posts
First tell us about your main panel. Breakers or fuse? Size of main breaker or fuse? If a breaker box is it full? What is the make and model if a breaker box. Ate there any subpanels? If so their size and actual loads on them such as pumps or machinery. Do you have electric heat, electric stove, electric water heater, electric clothes dryer?
 
  #3  
Old 05-12-09, 08:21 AM
I
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Near Lansing, Michigan
Posts: 10,941
Received 45 Votes on 43 Posts
Originally Posted by Jay6425 View Post
wondering how I can wire everything down to the panel a room at a time without having to call an electrician out to re-establish connections at the panel every time.
The real trouble with the piecemeal approach isn't so much the electrician as it is the permit and inspection process. You want to break the work up into big enough chunks so you don't have to pay a bunch of permit and inspection fees, which will also of course save your electrician a lot of wasted labor.
 
  #4  
Old 05-14-09, 11:03 AM
Z
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 6,296
Received 319 Votes on 285 Posts
If you're comfortable with wiring and appropriate codes for the rooms that you'll be working in, you may be able to become comfortable connecting and disconnecting branch circuits in the main panel. By turning off the main breaker, you remove power from the buss bars and breakers (though the large incoming wires are always hot). Working carefully and methodically, you can run the wires into the panel and to their respective breakers.

More of the issue that I run into when doing one room at a time is abandoning the old circuits. Invariably, the one circuit I disconnect for the room I'm working in controls 5 other receptacles that are used daily, which makes it a logistics exercise, with the use of some temporary extension cords to keep the microwave, TV, table lamp, and other key household items working.
 
 

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: