wiring recessed puck lights

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Old 05-16-09, 08:07 PM
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Question wiring recessed puck lights

Hello everyone,

I would like to install some puck lights into a soffit and controlled by a switch. These pucks are 120V 20W. There is no transformer, these lights plug directly into an outlet.

The instructions say not to place the power cords behind a wall (or soffit). My question is, would it be possible to replace the power cord and wire these puck lights directly to the switch? In other words, run romex from the switch to the puck lights. At the puck lights, cut off the existing power cord leaving about 4". Then use wire nuts to connect them to the 14/2 romex wire.

Do I need to do anything else to make this safer (like a junction box - not sure I can fit this through the cutout hole) or should I just forget about this idea?

thanks.
 
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Old 05-17-09, 04:25 AM
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Welcome to the forums! You are correct, the line cord can't be concealed in the wall. If you run romex from the switch to each location, you will need a junction box. Not sure if the puck has any kind of spanner adapter for the jbox or not. What brand lights do you have. It may help us to help you.
 
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Old 05-17-09, 07:01 AM
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Thanks for your reply.

The brand is Hampton Bay and I got them from HD or Lowes (I forget which store). Model on package says 148-120. It comes with 5 puck lights - each with its own lamp-style power cord. These connect into two supplied extension cords.

Do you think there is a fire hazard if I don't have a junction box? Can the junction box be concealed within the soffit? Do they make small junction boxes that will fit in a 2.5" hole?

Can someone recommend another option (that provides the same lighting effect as 20W halogen pucks)? One that was naturally designed for direct wiring.

thanks.
 
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Old 05-17-09, 07:29 AM
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The lights you describe may be intended for inside use only. under the soffit may protect them fro the rain some what but not from blown rain. The include extension cords are also probably not intended for out door use.
 
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Old 05-17-09, 10:32 AM
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Glad you brought that up, Ray. But I was thinking he was talking about a soffit in a kitchen. Not sure.
 
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Old 05-17-09, 11:06 AM
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So Reflection, as Chandler and I reflect on which hangover you have will you post back and tell us?
 
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Old 05-17-09, 12:04 PM
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Chandler, Ray,
I'm building some built-in bookshelves and there is a recessed wall with a "soffit" above it. Very similar to a kitchen soffit. This will only be indoors.

thanks
 
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Old 01-18-10, 06:10 PM
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Individually switched puck lights

I'd like to wire three individually-switched 20 watt 12 VAC puck lights in parallel to a single plug-in 60 watt transformer. Is there any problem with doing this, leaving 120 VAC applied to the transformer at all times, even when all the puck lights are switched off?
 
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Old 01-19-10, 07:07 PM
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For future posts, I'd recommend you start a new post instead of continuing one from a while ago. It will ensure you get prompt help!

As for your question, there should be no issue with what you're proposing. The only downside is that the transformer will always be on and always drawing power regardless whether the lights are on or off. More and more people are getting concerned with spending too much electricity (and $$) on devices that suck power regardless of whether they are on or off. Whether it's the right option for you is up to you.

Safety wise, you should be fine.
 
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