Moving an outlet

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Old 05-18-09, 08:23 AM
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Moving an outlet

I want to move my power outlet five feet above its current position for a TV installation project.

The outlet is in the middle of the series. Also, the wires in the current outlet have no slack.

My plan was two drop two wires from the new location to the old location and then use wire nut and electrical tape to tie everything together.

I wanted to know can i use the current blue box as a junction box. I would cover it with a blank plate? Does this box qualify as a junction box?

Thanks
 
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Old 05-18-09, 08:50 AM
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Yes, you can as long as it remains accessable. Make sure to use the same gauge wire as what is currently in the box. No electrical tape is needed.
 
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Old 05-18-09, 08:54 AM
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Originally Posted by terpsarlington View Post
I want to move my power outlet five feet above its current position for a TV installation project.
It's best to leave the existing one in place and add a new one for the tv in order to remain compliant with receptacle spacing code.

My plan was two drop two wires from the new location to the old location and then use wire nut and electrical tape to tie everything together.
Extend one cable (either 14/2 or 12/2 to match the existing AWG) from the old box to the new box.

I wanted to know can i use the current blue box as a junction box. I would cover it with a blank plate? Does this box qualify as a junction box?
Yes.
 
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Old 05-18-09, 08:56 AM
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Your idea is fine, but let me clean it up a bit so you know what to do.

You mention a blue box, so I'm guess that the existing outlet is in a plastic box. Turn off the power at the breaker. Drop one nm cable (romex) from the new outlet location to the old location. This cable has three conductors in it: black, white, and bare. Wrap the black wire around the gold screw (the screw that corresponds to the small slot on the new outlet), and the white wire around the silver screw (the screw that corresponds to the large slot in the new outlet). The bare conductor goes around the green ground screw on the new outlet. These conductors get wrapped around the screw one single time, clockwise, and they do not overlap. Make your splices in the existing outlet box near the floor. You don't need tape. Make the splices good and tight, and make sure your wirenut is tight, and tape will not be necessary. Put on your blank plate, turn on the power and test the new outlet.

Just curious, but why do you want to get rid of the old outlet? It is not necessary. You can leave the old one and still install a new one from this same box.
 

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Old 05-18-09, 09:40 AM
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How would i do the wiring for this if I leave the old outlet in. The old outlet is in the middle of the run.

I actually want to leave the old outlet, but did not know how the wiring diagram would look. Can someone explain the wiring diagram if i leave the old outlet.

Thanks
 
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Old 05-18-09, 09:48 AM
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In that box you'll have three each of black, white and bare wires. Additionally cut a 6" pigtail of each color and connect those to the brass, silver and green screws on the receptacle respectively. You'll now have four of each color. Wirenut the like colors together using red wirenuts and carefully fold them back into the box.
 
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Old 05-18-09, 10:02 AM
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You guys are great. The wiring diagram seems simple. I never knew you could pigtail outlets.

Thanks for all your help.
 
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Old 05-22-09, 05:40 PM
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Originally Posted by ibpooks View Post
It's best to leave the existing one in place and add a new one for the tv in order to remain compliant with receptacle spacing code.
Out of curiosity, how would he be non-compliant?
 
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Old 05-22-09, 05:57 PM
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Originally Posted by VoltageHz View Post
Out of curiosity, how would he be non-compliant?
Law of triangles. Hypotenuse is longer then the sides. The distant between the receptacles would increase. Distance would be now measured diagonally If it is already at the max permitted that would push it beyond. Imagine two right triangles back to back. Distance would now be to the apex.
 
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Old 05-22-09, 06:07 PM
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I understand that part. But I thought it was only a linear measurement along the wall.

If you want to get into the triangle thing, we can average the height of most cord and plug connected devices, I bet they are much higher than the 13-18" AFF height of receptacles. Should we now make it an 11' span between receptacles?
 
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Old 05-22-09, 06:28 PM
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Originally Posted by VoltageHz View Post
I understand that part. But I thought it was only a linear measurement along the wall.

If you want to get into the triangle thing, we can average the height of most cord and plug connected devices, I bet they are much higher than the 13-18" AFF height of receptacles. Should we now make it an 11' span between receptacles?
Excellent well reasoned response to my slightly off the cuff answer.. We will just have to wait for the pros.
 
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Old 05-22-09, 06:31 PM
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Originally Posted by ray2047 View Post
Excellent well reasoned response to my slightly off the cuff answer.. We will just have to wait for the pros.
I do commercial electrical work, I let the engineers figure this type of stuff out Beer 4U2

Hell, I gotta go spend a few hours in the code book trying to figure out how to properly power a shed I'll end up just getting drunk and lazy and asking here.
 
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Old 05-22-09, 07:00 PM
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OOPS! Sorry I didn't realize you were a commercial electrician.
 
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Old 05-22-09, 07:38 PM
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Originally Posted by VoltageHz View Post
I understand that part. But I thought it was only a linear measurement along the wall.

If you want to get into the triangle thing, we can average the height of most cord and plug connected devices, I bet they are much higher than the 13-18" AFF height of receptacles. Should we now make it an 11' span between receptacles?
I have always thought that it was based upon the perimeter of the room.

If the new receptacles were placed higher than 5'6 IIRC it would not count into the 6/12 spacing if the old receptacle would be removed and would now be non-compliant.
 
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Old 05-22-09, 09:14 PM
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There are no triangles or hypotenuses to consider here. Let's not go too far off into the weeds.
 
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Old 05-22-09, 10:47 PM
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PCBoss .,

It is counted on perimeter on the wall and nice gotcha if you have floor receptale becarefull some case it will count as spacing for receptale { it did happend to me once and after that I got wise with it }

For all readers here just keep in your mind the NEC do have 6/12 rules for most receptale unless specifed in codes or area that will need closer gap { spaceing }

Really., I will just leave that receptale alone due somecase if you have flat TV mounted pretty high if over 5.5 foot { 1.67M} then it useally don't count for spaceing requiremet.

Merci,Marc
 
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