Retro Box Q

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Old 05-26-09, 11:17 PM
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Retro Box Q

<a href="http://s703.photobucket.com/albums/ww31/oscarbravo22/?action=view&current=100_5153.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="http://i703.photobucket.com/albums/ww31/oscarbravo22/100_5153.jpg" border="0" alt="Photobucket"></a>

This is the house side of the outside wall,the plaster ,sheathing and the ''insulation'' [ the birds nest like material ] are 2'' thick.
I need to install a plug but Im not shure what kind of box to use .
Advise?
Thank you
 
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Old 05-26-09, 11:47 PM
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Here are several different types of "old work" electrical boxes which may work. Just need to see which would work the best...

Single-Gang Old-Work Electrical Box - Smarthome

Raco 523 Switch Box

Raco 517 Switch Box

More...
Old Work Electrical Box - Google Image Search
 
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Old 05-26-09, 11:50 PM
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By the way, with most of these electrical boxes, you place the box in the hole, then screw in the screws and this makes a fin pop out from behind and secure the electrical box to the wall.
 
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Old 05-27-09, 09:07 AM
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I'm inclined to suggest you not use what appears in the photo. Presuming the box will be on the interior side of an exterior wall , and the wall-finish is lath & plaster, I suggest you cut a new hole for an "old-work" gem box. You need the gem box as a "template" for scribing the outline of the box on the wall.

You first must chisel a narrow verticle slot in the plaster to expose the laths, and the box must be centered on the center of a lath, i.e., center of box = center of a lath.This is so the "ears" of the gem-box bear on plaster which is over a lath "base" . Next , you scribe the outline of the box on the wall,neatly chip away the plaster , and neatly cut away the lath using is "fine-cut" keyhole saw. Any gap between the wall-finish and the box should be filled with a patching compound.
 
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Old 05-27-09, 09:04 PM
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Thank you for replies,as I mentioned the wall is 2'' thick and I haven't seen boxes with the ability to clamp 2'' worth of wall
 
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Old 05-27-09, 09:20 PM
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Maybe a gang box and madison clips. If factory isn't long enough go old screw and make your own.
 
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Old 05-28-09, 10:03 AM
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Forget madison bars an a back clamp. One that whose ears screw into the lath is just fine.
You can get them with a knockout in the back, which you can use a standard box clamp on. Some have holes which you can use to also screw into the backing boards.

You can get them deep enough to not worry about the box clamp.
 
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Old 05-28-09, 04:51 PM
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Originally Posted by RODEL View Post
Thank you for replies,as I mentioned the wall is 2'' thick and I haven't seen boxes with the ability to clamp 2'' worth of wall
What about the first one linked by Bill190? The Carlon blue? Even if the screws are too short, you could probably replace them with longer ones. That's assuming you can use plastic boxes.

If you're using metal, the best way to go is to clean up the hole, patch with compound, and use a metal old work box with ears only as described by others.

I would upsize to a two-gang if you have room and time. You can't have too much space in a box or too many receptacles.
 
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Old 05-28-09, 06:39 PM
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With a box of this style you don't have to worry about the thickness of the finish materials.

The stud provides the support, not the lath which can crumble and fall off if flexed too much.

You would just need to cut your holes next to a stud.
 
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