pool pump quit-capacitor bad?

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Old 05-28-09, 06:56 AM
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pool pump quit-capacitor bad?

I have a pool pump with a 2HP motor. End of last season it quit working but since I was going to be closing pool I never dealt with it. I started to look at it, and found that the motor hums and after a few seconds, it trips the breaker. The impellar is not blocked. I started to take apart and found that the turns turns without binding anywhere. It is stiff, but uniform throughout rotation. I don't have much experience with AC motors so don't know how it should feel when you spin shaft. I know DC motors (the small ones I have played with when younger) kinda have some areas where hard to turn (pulling apart magnets) and then it jerks a little and it is very easy to turn for a while as magnets repel. Didn't know if AC motor should be same? I got on web site that sells pool pump parts and it said that if motor hums or if shaft spins freely that capacitor could be bad. So my motor hums, but would a bad capacitor cause breaker to trip? And I don't get why bad capacitor would make shaft spin freely? The capacitor is mounted to side of motor, but there is no labeling on cover regarding capacitor.
 
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Old 05-28-09, 07:20 AM
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Some of the single phase motours do have capaitor to assist the starting and some don't have them but most percentage of them will have a starting switch AKA centifuge switch there is a weight on one end of the motour shaft and starting switch will be located there too.

Most common curpit is sticky switch or failed capaitor but you will have to take one end of the motour apart and you will see the starting switch / centifuge switch located in there.

When the starting capaitor fail or switch fail to close in the starting circuit the motor will hum and the current drawage will be much higher to the point the breaker will trip or fuse blow.

I will show the picture what it look like.



Now as you see on the right side of the photo you will see weights there that where the starting switch useally be located there. that one of most common failure on single phase motour beside the capaitor is other common failure as well.

Now for the cost of new switch it will depending on the manufacter of that motor and some motour shop will have a switch on hand but if the cost of the switch is more than what you think it worth to fix it then get new motour.

But I don't think the switch will be that expensive at all IIRC it should be less than 40 { apx $45} again it will depending on the manufacter.

Merci,Marc
 
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Old 05-28-09, 09:14 AM
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we purchased the house in 99 and the motor has not been changed. I don't think it was new in 99 either. So probably near end of like for motor, correct? hate to spend money and then have something else break. I am debating on replacing the whole pump/motor as well as filter. I think the pump is over 30 years old. Has there been improvements to the pumps that would make it worthwhile to replace the whole pump(not just the motor)? will increased efficiency of new pump be worth investment? maybe need to ask this in the pool forum.
 
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Old 05-28-09, 09:05 PM
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You can probably buy a replacement capacitor for 4$ or $5 at any motor rewind shop. You might get them at a pool supply house too, but will probably pay more.
If the cap is mounted on the side like you said, it should be easy to remove. Replace it with a similar voltage and capacitance (microfarad) rating. Old motors that haven't been abused are usually much more robustly designed than newer ones. For a couple of bucks, it's worth trying.
 
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Old 06-01-09, 07:00 AM
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I had to replace the motor on my pump after only a few years.

I bought the replacement motor from some motor shop online. It was an easy swap out. Pump still works fine.

Regards,

Boris
 
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Old 06-06-09, 07:36 AM
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2hp have so much power they can start without the switch, my thinking is if its tripping the breaker ITS JUNK . search for your Local Pool Pump Repair Guy . THEY SHOULD TEST YOUR MOTOR FOR YOU FOR FREE.. I do Free testing
 
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Old 06-16-09, 07:37 PM
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I took some things apart. There is a 22.5 uF, 370V capacitor mounted to the side of motor. On back where the electrical connections are located, I found the start switch. Appears to be closed and is spring loaded in that position. I can push against weight and it opens. I sanded it a little where the contacts are. I also found another capacitor near start switch and appears to be wired through the switch. It is labeled 36-43 uF 230V (the label is coming off so this is my best guess.) I would think that this is start capacitor and other is run capacitor? when I turn motor on, the shaft will move a little and then within several seconds the breaker will trip. so, which capacitor should I try to replace first? Is there a way to test them? If the motor is bad, I don't think I want to have it rebuilt. But if it is just capacitor bad, I will replace that obviously.
 
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Old 06-16-09, 11:15 PM
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The starting capitor is useally larger than running capiator due they are designed to handle surge of current during start up however the running capaitor it is sized closer to the running current and the running capaitor is always engerized during running time.

I will suggest that you replace the starting capaitor first that useally the first to go then second to go is running capaitor.

{ I like the CSCR single phase motor they draw less current than other types }

Merci,Marc
 
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Old 06-17-09, 05:44 AM
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when you say larger, you mean in uF not physical size. The capacitor that is near start switch is a lot smaller than the externally mounted one. But it is rated at higher uF. So which is the start capacitor?
 
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Old 06-17-09, 05:14 PM
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Originally Posted by hammerash View Post
when you say larger, you mean in uF not physical size. The capacitor that is near start switch is a lot smaller than the externally mounted one. But it is rated at higher uF. So which is the start capacitor?
The starting capaitor is useally larger than running capiator BTW what brand name the motor it is maybe I can able look it up to verify the correct one.

Merci,Marc
 
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Old 06-17-09, 07:18 PM
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GE mod 5KCR39UN
Ser # RFJ 2075X
HP 2
RPM 3450 PH1
V230 Code J
A 8.9 56Z

large external capacitor GE Z97F9604 22.5uF 370V
smaller capacitor near start switch Phillips can't get all of the model number 36-43uF 230V (or around there, can't remember exactly)
 
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Old 06-17-09, 10:58 PM
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Just give me a day to verify it however I will send you a PM with the company athorized repair shop location due the forum policy I just can not put all the details in here.

Merci,Marc
 
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Old 06-27-09, 09:35 AM
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I'm having issues that sound just like this. A few months ago I had a motor that used to do the exact same thing, motor would be working fine. I would turn it off so I could switch over for a rinse or whatever and when I would try to turn it back on it would hum for a few seconds and then trip the breaker. I ended up replacing the entire motor as I felt it was near the end of it's life cycle. Yesterday, with the new motor I vacuumed the pool, went to go wash the sand out and when I turned it back on I got the hum again and breaker tripped. I assume it's the capacitor again, but why would another capacitor go bad? I let my motor run 24/7. It is on it's own 20 amp breaker and the motor is plugged into it's own plug with a light type on and off switch. Basically, could an electrical issue cause the capacitors to go bad?
 
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Old 09-05-09, 02:29 PM
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I faced a similar problem with a PentAir "WhisperFlo" Pool Pump (w A.O. Smith motor). It had been working fine but then stopped and began to overheat but did not trip any breakers. It would now just hum when energized. First I found that the 2HP motor wiring (220 VAC) pulled out of the snap-on clips at the back of the motor. The clips had not been crimped properly. This was also found to be the case on an adjacent 1HP motor used for a water feature. Hmmm... could this be the problem? No. I then removed six bolts and two nuts holding the motor to the pump housing (but not the four motor bolts). I then pulled the motor away from the pump housing. It seemed to spin freely. BTW if you ever need to replace the motor shaft seal remember that the hex head screw at the end of the motor shaft is "a Left Hand thread." I rebolted the motor to the pump housing after carefully coating the pump O-ring with a Pool& Spa Lube. Then I noted that the motor starting capacitor on the 1HP motor was the same as for the problem 2HP pool pump motor. I swapped the two capacitors. The problem followed the capacitor to the 1HP motor (it now just hummed). The capacitor was rated 30 UF (microfarad) 370 VAC. The ONLINE Store had them two for $17.60. Regards Challegeme.
Originally Posted by hammerash View Post
I have a pool pump with a 2HP motor. End of last season it quit working but since I was going to be closing pool I never dealt with it. I started to look at it, and found that the motor hums and after a few seconds, it trips the breaker. The impellar is not blocked. I started to take apart and found that the turns turns without binding anywhere. It is stiff, but uniform throughout rotation. I don't have much experience with AC motors so don't know how it should feel when you spin shaft. I know DC motors (the small ones I have played with when younger) kinda have some areas where hard to turn (pulling apart magnets) and then it jerks a little and it is very easy to turn for a while as magnets repel. Didn't know if AC motor should be same? I got on web site that sells pool pump parts and it said that if motor hums or if shaft spins freely that capacitor could be bad. So my motor hums, but would a bad capacitor cause breaker to trip? And I don't get why bad capacitor would make shaft spin freely? The capacitor is mounted to side of motor, but there is no labeling on cover regarding capacitor.
 
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Old 09-05-09, 02:37 PM
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My answer to hannerash: I faced a similar problem with a PentAir "WhisperFlo" Pool Pump (w A.O. Smith motor). It had been working fine but then stopped and began to overheat but did not trip any breakers. It would now just hum when energized. First I found that the 2HP motor wiring (220 VAC) pulled out of the snap-on clips at the back of the motor. The clips had not been crimped properly. This was also found to be the case on an adjacent 1HP motor used for a water feature. Hmmm... could this be the problem? No. I then removed six bolts and two nuts holding the motor to the pump housing (but not the four motor bolts). I then pulled the motor away from the pump housing. It seemed to spin freely. BTW if you ever need to replace the motor shaft seal remember that the hex head screw at the end of the motor shaft is "a Left Hand thread." I rebolted the motor to the pump housing after carefully coating the pump O-ring with a Pool& Spa Lube. Then I noted that the motor starting capacitor on the 1HP motor was the same as for the problem 2HP pool pump motor. I swapped the two capacitors. The problem followed the capacitor to the 1HP motor (it now just hummed). The capacitor was rated 30 UF (microfarad) 370 VAC. The ONLINE Store had them two for $17.60. Regards Challengeme.
Originally Posted by Jim H View Post
I'm having issues that sound just like this. A few months ago I had a motor that used to do the exact same thing, motor would be working fine. I would turn it off so I could switch over for a rinse or whatever and when I would try to turn it back on it would hum for a few seconds and then trip the breaker. I ended up replacing the entire motor as I felt it was near the end of it's life cycle. Yesterday, with the new motor I vacuumed the pool, went to go wash the sand out and when I turned it back on I got the hum again and breaker tripped. I assume it's the capacitor again, but why would another capacitor go bad? I let my motor run 24/7. It is on it's own 20 amp breaker and the motor is plugged into it's own plug with a light type on and off switch. Basically, could an electrical issue cause the capacitors to go bad?
 
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