boxes are a little shallow-need extenders?

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Old 05-28-09, 08:06 AM
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boxes are a little shallow-need extenders?

I put my boxes using the little tabs on them to set them 1/2" from studs. but now that drywall is up, a lot of them have gap between box and face of drywall. What is max allowed-1/16" or 1/8"? why are they not flush? I suspect that sometimes the studs are not in line and as drywall is floated over them if the box is on stud set back slightly the drywall is not pulled tight up against it? also, the studs have rounded edges so if you put the little tab up to the face, the rounded edge could cause you to end up with it set back a little farther than 1/2"?

I would like to avoid this in rest of the work. so what is best way to set depth of boxes? I know i measured some of them and they seemed right on, now I have a gap? Of course I don't know if any of the ones I actually measured have a gap since I don't remember which ones I measured. I did a few just to check, then they seemed OK so I didn't continue to measure. Is it better if they stick out too far? It seems easier to just use my dremel oscillating tool to make it flush than to have to buy extenders.
 
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Old 05-28-09, 08:31 AM
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In drywall, you're allowed up to 1/8" before you have to get out the extenders.

If you really set them proud of the stud by 1/2", and if you really used 1/2" drywall without additional shims to compensate for warped studs, then they should have been perfectly flush. One of the two preceeding "if" statements is incorrect. Yes, you might have used the tabs improperly. When in doubt, use a tape measure to see where you are actually setting them. The tabs are just a rough guide. Who is installing your drywall? Are you sure it's really 1/2" drywall? Ask the installers if they are needing to use a lot of shims? Maybe your studs are not very straight or not in a very straight line.

I'd much, much worse if they stick out too far. Being recessed a bit too much is far preferrable. Do not modify boxes with a dremel!

Drywall should never be "floated over" studs. No competent installer would do that. It's a recipe for disaster.
 
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Old 05-28-09, 08:32 AM
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For noncombustionbale walls you can have the box sink in 1/8 inch (3mm) the most otherwise if you have combustibale wall then it must be flush.

I know some will get by with 1/4 inch(6mm) Some area may not allowed that but some do IMO 1/4 inch is on the borderline as well that is allowed on NON combustion wall.

I don't have the NEC art number related to this at the moment but I am sure one of the members here will provide the correct answer as well.

A tip if you do the rough in with wall boxes some will have correct setting and some don't if you ran into that situation what I do is push them out a little more by time the drywall is up it will be flush and make it easier to get the devices on nice.

Typically what I do is set at 5/8(15mm) for half inch drywall for 3/4(19mm) drywall I keep just slightly shy over 3/4 inch.
However if you see some stud are little twisted you can add a shim on back end of the box that will useally help to get it stright as well.

Merci,Marc
 
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Old 05-28-09, 09:02 AM
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Somebody makes a box that has adjustable depth after installation. You secure it to the stud and after drywall is installed, you turn a couple of side screws to change the depth. Carlon? I am not sure who makes these.

I am sure you have seen mentioned the Arlington plastic extenders too, which are easy to use. But I realize that does not directly answer the question.
 
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Old 05-28-09, 09:31 AM
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Another trick that helps is to make yourself a template out of 1/2" plywood or drywall scrap and cut a box hole out of it. Use a scrap that's long enough to span the whole stud space. If you hold (or screw) that template up to the face of the stud, you can then mount the box so that it's flush to where the drywall will actually sit once spanned over the neighboring stud(s).
 
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Old 05-28-09, 10:45 AM
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thanks guys. I think they are 1/16" to 1/8" set back. there may be one that is 3/16". I thought just using the tabs would set me right at 1/2". I just checked one of the boxes that I used. the tabs are 7/16", so 1/16" shy of 1/2". and as studs are rounded slightly on corners, the box can sit probably about 1/16" farther back when you touch tab to face of stud. I thought about doing what you suggested ibpooks. That would get me the best result. Or I could just make a little reusable spacer to use on stud face during install to be sure box is 1/2" from wall face and any irregularities in wall hopefully won't leave many boxes more than 1/8" recessed.

I do have some of those adjustable boxes. but they are expensive to use everywhere. I bought them for special situations where I know that getting depth right could be problem. May use them in kitchen so if I want to tile the backsplash area, I have some adjustment.

so now do I install switches/ receptacles, leaving cover plates off, and get final? I figured they need cover plates off to check box depth.
 
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Old 05-28-09, 11:49 AM
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I don't know about there, but if I left the cover plates off here I would probably be paying a reinspection fee. Final means all done, ready-to-go: Flip switch to see if light goes on, turn off breaker to see if labeled item shuts off, make sure GFCIs trip. I thought maybe the inspector would take off a cover plate to look inside, and I am sure they could, but it hasn't happened.
 
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Old 05-28-09, 09:31 PM
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