120V subpanel

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Old 05-29-09, 12:59 PM
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120V subpanel

Is there such a thing as a 120V one bus subpanel? It seems I have only seen 120V/240V two bus subpanels. I only need two breakers slots. Thanks.
 
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Old 05-29-09, 01:12 PM
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The 120v are special purpose and probably only available from a dealer. Simplest cheapest solution is to use a 240 and only use every other slot. Since you only want two breakers that should work. Another way is to fasten two pigtails to the incoming hot and run one pigtail to each bus. You will probably need to by a ground bar kit. Remember to isolate the neutral. Label the box "120 volts only" just so the next repair person will know what it is and isn't.
 
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Old 05-29-09, 01:25 PM
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Why not just run two circuits?
 
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Old 05-29-09, 02:34 PM
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Originally Posted by bobbsledd View Post
Why not just run two circuits?
Maybe detached building? You can only one circuit to a detached building. The exception isn't relevant here because both circuits are the same voltage. Also wire may be a bit cheaper. Of course he didn't actually say a detached building so it may be just to save on wire. Of course in this he could run a multi-wire circuit.
 
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Old 05-29-09, 03:16 PM
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This is for a detached feed barn. I wanted a circuit for a 20 AMP receptacle and another circuit for the lights. I contemplated spicing the A\B buses together in the sub panel, but was afraid the inspector would die laughing when he saw it. Thanks for the tips. It is always appreciated.
 
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Old 05-29-09, 03:32 PM
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If you really only need one or two 20A circuits, you can get away with using a simple switch or AC disconnect. You don't typically need a subpanel for that type of setup.

As you stated, you could use a 2-leg panel and connect both legs, or just use one, but it's an expense you don't need. If you do this though, you will want to prominently label the subpanel as 120v only. (I'm not sure if it's required by code, but you'll confuse the heck out of whoever comes next).

At least consider running a MWBC to your building. Using 12/3 (or 10/3 depending on distance), you can end up with two 20A circuits for only a bit more than one.
 
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Old 05-29-09, 11:50 PM
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I have seen 120 volt subpanel but not very often anyway that more like special useage { very limited useage and sizewise as well }

But it can be done but normally run with MWBC there is not much diffrence on costwise VS specal order subpanel set up and nice thing that with MWBC you can have two circuits with one feeder going to non attached buildings { the codes are very specific on this }

But if you going have anything more than two circuits or more than 20 amps then you will have to put a subpanel to handle the loads { that something you will have to think about down the road when you add stuff later }

For one or two circuit with single feeder a simple single or double pole switch will useally serve as disconnection useage.

Merci,Marc
 
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Old 06-02-09, 12:16 PM
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MWBC sounds like a better solution, unfortunately I painted myself in a corner and wired the lights using 14 gauge wire already. I went against my fatherís advice to never use the stuff, but it was free from a neighbor still in the shrink wrap. I guess it wouldnít be that hard to rip it out and eliminate the need for additional over current protection. Thanks for the advice!
 
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