Shed Help..

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Old 07-02-09, 09:26 PM
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Shed Help..

Looking for a little guidance guys. I am about to run electricity to my shed. I am gonna list what ill be running in the shed, not sure how to gauge the amps ill be running, could use some help with figuring that out.

1. will be a light mounted outside of building.
2. light mounted inside of building
3. 4 outlets inside (1 freezer, 1 bandsaw, 1 drill press)
4. 1 outlet outside of shed. (General purpose)

I currently have 6 guage/4 wire. Will this be sufficient?
I will be burying my cable 18 inches in sealed PVC conduit.
Plan on using a disconnect inside the shed.
At the moment everything I would be using is 120V, but would like to have 240V available.
How much amperage am i looking at?

How does this sound? Feel free to fill in any blanks I may be missing.
 
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Old 07-02-09, 10:39 PM
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What is 6 guage/4 wire? Are you installing a sub-panel? If so describe. Describe breaker at main panel you are going to feed it with.
 
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Old 07-03-09, 07:44 AM
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What is 6 guage/4 wire?
Sorry, I meant 6 awg /4 wire, type SOOW

Are you installing a sub-panel? If so describe.
I will be installing a sub panel, I havent purchased it yet. In my OP I stated i was looking for help guaging the amperage needed. I listed the loads I would be using. Based on the loads listed, what panel would be recommended?

Describe breaker at main panel you are going to feed it with.
I will be adding a new breaker to the main panel, once the amperage question is answered. I imagine it will be a 2 pole breaker to feed 240V. But this is still undecided.

Also wanted to add that it will be about 35 ft from the main breaker panel to the sub panel.
 

Last edited by drexendelsangre; 07-03-09 at 08:19 AM.
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Old 07-03-09, 08:34 AM
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Sorry, you will have to use another wiring method. Flexible cord like the SOOW is not to be used in place of permanent wiring.

Since you are talking about conduit you would just use individual conductors rated THHN/THWN to feed the subpanel in your shed. You would need 2 hots in black, 1 white neutral and 1 green ground.

With the #6 you could feed it with a 50 amp breaker and have plenty of power for your shed. You could also use #8 and a 40 amp breaker.

You will need to leave the neutrals and ground isolated from each other in the subpanel. You will also need a ground rod connected to the panel with a #6 copper conductor.
 
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Old 07-03-09, 08:43 AM
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does the amperage of the breaker change if i decide to go 240V? It would of course be a 2 pole breaker, but would a 50 amp 2 pole breaker work? or would that change the requirements?
 
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Old 07-03-09, 08:58 AM
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The breaker needs to be properly sized to protect the wire. Voltage will not matter.

A 2 pole breaker would just give you the ability to have 240 volt circuits and to lessen the load on a 120 volt feed to the shed because the load is split over the 2 hots legs instead of one.
 
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Old 07-03-09, 09:04 AM
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Thanks, gonna go get the cable you suggested now.
 
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Old 07-03-09, 09:08 AM
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Originally Posted by drexendelsangre View Post
does the amperage of the breaker change if i decide to go 240V? It would of course be a 2 pole breaker, but would a 50 amp 2 pole breaker work? or would that change the requirements?
No the amperage of the supply breaker doesn't change but available power at the subpanel doubles. There would be no reason to do this 120v.

To anticipate your next question on size of subpanel I would suggest 100a so you have plenty of room for breakers. Yes, subpanel may be larger then the supply breaker. You will also need a main breaker in the subpanel if you have more then six breakers, Size of main breaker in subpanel should be equal to or greater then the main panel supply breaker.

I would suggest you buy a book such as Wiring Simplified available at Home Depot and study up on what you need to do.
 
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Old 07-03-09, 09:10 AM
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Originally Posted by drexendelsangre View Post
Thanks, gonna go get the cable you suggested now.
He wasn't suggesting cable. He was suggesting individual wires.
 
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Old 07-03-09, 12:01 PM
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yeah, i gathered that much, thnx.
 
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Old 07-03-09, 08:52 PM
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Originally Posted by drexendelsangre View Post
I am gonna list what ill be running in the shed,

1. will be a light mounted outside of building.
2. light mounted inside of building
3. 4 outlets inside (1 freezer, 1 bandsaw, 1 drill press)
4. 1 outlet outside of shed. (General purpose)

.
Assuming the shed will be closed up to prevent your bandsaw and drill press from walking off, be prepared for that freezer to add significantly to your electric bill. Enclosed fridges and freezers are the biggest "high bill complaint culprits" we have at our POCO.
 
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Old 07-04-09, 10:04 AM
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Originally Posted by WFOWFO View Post
Assuming the shed will be closed up to prevent your bandsaw and drill press from walking off, be prepared for that freezer to add significantly to your electric bill. Enclosed fridges and freezers are the biggest "high bill complaint culprits" we have at our POCO.
Im a locksmith by trade. The shed will plenty secure.
 
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Old 07-05-09, 08:07 PM
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Originally Posted by drexendelsangre View Post
Im a locksmith by trade. The shed will plenty secure.
I think what WFOWFO was stating didn't have anything to do with the security, but the fact that fridge and freezers in an enclosed space do not operate efficiently, due to both heat and lack of airflow. They need ventilation to work at their expected efficiencies. You should plan on some type of air movement to allow fresh air into the shed.
 
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