110v to 220v converters

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Old 08-12-09, 03:51 PM
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110v to 220v converters

Hello,
I just purchased a welder. Turns out that it is 220 volt. I have seen 110v to 220v converters and was wondering if this could be an option for me. Also, if I can use a converter what specs should I be looking for to make sure I get the right one? Here are some of the spec for the welder. Thanks for the help.

Welding Current: 35 to 110 Amps
Duty Cycle: 15% @ 110 Amps / 100% @ 35 Amps
Power Consumption: 220 volt / 60Hz / Single Phase / 24.5
Open Circuit Voltage: 40 volts Max
 
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Old 08-12-09, 03:57 PM
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Why not just run a 240v line from your breaker box? Really don't know what you mean by a "converter". Transformer? Maybe buck-boost transformer? You would need at least a 50a 120v source. Not very practical except as a lat resort option.
 

Last edited by ray2047; 08-12-09 at 04:53 PM.
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Old 08-12-09, 04:39 PM
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There is no converter that would be of much use.
Your problem is more the amperage that the welder would draw and not the voltage.

The reason your welder is 220 volts is that the amperage would be too high in a 115 volt model.
The 24.5 amps the welder draws at 220 volts would be near 5o amps on a 120 volt circuit.

You need to either wire in a 220 volt circuit or take the welder back and get a smaller one in 115 volt.
If you did get a welder that works on a 120 volt circuit it would not have as high a duty cycle as the one you have now.
 
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Old 08-12-09, 05:54 PM
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The most simple approach is run new 240 volt circuit for the welder however there is one issue you will run into this is the garage or workshop is attached to the house or not ?

The reason why I asked here due there are few code realted issue with detached garage/workshop building so before I can go on and also check your breaker box to see if you have empty two pole space there if so you are in luck with it.

Merci, Marc
 
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Old 08-13-09, 12:44 PM
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Ok, I was wondering if I might have to put in a new line. I will be using the welder in my garage. It is an attached garage. I checked my breaker box and I have two open spots. 7 and 8 to be exact. I'm no expert with electrical, but I usally figure it out. Eventhough breaker boxes to make me a little nervous. Is this something that I will be able to do on my own or will I need to bring in the experts? Thanks for the help.
 
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Old 08-13-09, 02:31 PM
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It could be an easy job for a homeowner provided that you learn enough to do the job properly and take out an electrical permit.
 
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Old 08-13-09, 05:04 PM
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You should be able to run it on a 30a 2-pole breaker. Wire size is a bit trickier but I would recommend you use #10 two conductor NM-1 (Romex). Since it is a welder you could actually use 12-2 but I do not recommend it. In the future someone might mistake it for a general purpose 240v circuit and overload it.
 
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Old 08-14-09, 03:42 PM
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So I'm looking at a 30a 2-pole breaker in the panel in my house. The #10 NM-1 out to the garage. Now should I put a small panel in the garage so I can shut the power off in there. or go directly to a socket? By the way the socket they suggest to put in is a 3-Prong, 220 VAC, polarized, twist lock NEMA #L6-30 or equivalent. Not sure if that will effect the products I need or not. Thanks again for all the help.
 
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Old 08-14-09, 04:25 PM
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The receptacle and plug serve as a disconnect so no other disconnect is needed.

Just a bit confused. You said:
It is an attached garage.
but now you say:
out to the garage
. As long as the garage is part of the house you are good to go.
 
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Old 08-14-09, 07:52 PM
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Sorry for the confusion. The garage is attached to the house. I have to send a line from the box which is in the basement, through the wall into the garage. About three feet should get me there. So I'm looking at the 30a breaker, 3 feet of line, and the receptacle. That doesn't seem to painful price wise. I'm I missing anything? Thanks for the help. Much appreciated.
 
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Old 08-14-09, 08:00 PM
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No, you have it. If you need anymore help just ask.
 
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Old 08-17-09, 06:13 PM
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i used to run my stick arc welder on a 30 amp and after running long beads it would heat up the breaker and pop.
then i would have to go to the basement and switch it back on. after a few hundred times that really gets to you. i had to put in a 50 and new outlet so i could weld all day at 100 amps and never worry about the pop. i`m not a commercial welder but some times you get a big welding project. i would put at least a 40 in your box and run a plug out there with conduit for just the welder. nothing else. use good #10 stranded wire color coded for your electrical codes. white, red black. the conduit acts as another ground. which helps with an arc welder. runnig 220 right from the box will be alot more effecient
than a converter.
 
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Old 08-17-09, 09:39 PM
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Originally Posted by printer-man View Post
i used to run my stick arc welder on a 30 amp and after running long beads it would heat up the breaker and pop.
then i would have to go to the basement and switch it back on. after a few hundred times that really gets to you. i had to put in a 50 and new outlet so i could weld all day at 100 amps and never worry about the pop. i`m not a commercial welder but some times you get a big welding project. i would put at least a 40 in your box and run a plug out there with conduit for just the welder. nothing else. use good #10 stranded wire color coded for your electrical codes. white, red black. the conduit acts as another ground. which helps with an arc welder. runnig 220 right from the box will be alot more effecient
than a converter.
I wrote it in bold to hightlight the point here.,

Not all conduit will work as ground any weak point or loose fitting will work as very poor or no ground that why I always run EGC conductor with it. { espcally this is true with PVC so pay attetion to details.}

Now for straght 240 volts which do not require netural you only need two hot conductors any colour but not White , Green or Grey those three colours are only resevered for netrual useage and green is for ground useage.

There is specal code extempt for welder useage but I used them very loosely { not too often } due too easy to abuse it and yes you can use larger breaker for welder useage but it will affect by duty cycle percentage and type of welder it is.

Merci,Marc
 
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Old 08-18-09, 06:45 AM
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If you are going to install 40A breaker I would run #8 wire not 10.
 
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Old 08-18-09, 06:16 PM
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i should have been more clear as i do not ever use pvc conduit. and yes (your right)you need the white and green neutral and ground. #8 wire (stranded would be over kill for 40 on 220 single phase) sometimes it`s hard to find a beaker that takes #8 in these low amps, even on 3 phase. there is a code for wire to amps but i can`t remember it right now.as for the loose fittings on (steel)conduit i`ve never had a problem as we always run a ground wire back to the box. once again i should have stated things better. it is hard to type and remember what i`m typing about. thank-you for the corrections. for straight 240 i still would recomend a ground wire, especially for a welder. i`ve been jolted by them a couple times and it`s not fun.
 
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Old 08-18-09, 06:25 PM
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your right)you need the white and green neutral
Was that a mistype about the neutral. No neutral is used on a 240v circuit. Maybe you are thinking of circuits for equipment like dryers and stoves that have some 120v components.
 
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Old 08-18-09, 06:44 PM
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kinda...you need the green ground. but not the neutral white.
for the straight 240. i always run both so that in case later on if someone else uses it for another application then it`s covered. i wire alot of machines with variable voltages internally. so i never really think of not running the white (neutral) i should think more before posting.

and i was thinking that #8 stranded may be a good idea if you are going further away, but i always over wire. i`ve never had a fire or break down that way. better be safe than sorry.
i would have to assume that this would be a light use application, but sometimes you need to make it heavy use
just in case. just because the power is there dosen`t mean you have to use it.
 
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Old 08-18-09, 07:43 PM
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And welcome to the group printer-man. We sometimes hold your feet to the fire of a burning NEC book but we are really quite friendly.
 
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Old 08-18-09, 07:53 PM
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i had an electrical inspector hold up a service connect
because my electrician didn`t put orange tape on the high leg
of the 240 3-phase. i didn`t know anything at the time about this stuff ( about 9 years ago) but i started when my guy was kinda coasting his way along. he "forgot" to do a few little things here & there nothing major but enough for the insp. to call him on it. the insp. ran BY THE BOOK. even the NRTL "UL"
Labels had to be up to date.
i`ve learned alot over the years from some really good people, but i will always need to learn more. i know this, that`s how i found this site.
 
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