Rules when working around gas lines

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Old 08-22-09, 01:11 PM
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Rules when working around gas lines

I have been working on making my ultimate man cave and the first step was to knock out a wall to make it bigger.

The following picture shows what I had before I took out the studs and electrical that was there. For the mean time I just pulled the cables up into the attic.



The outlet going into the house was just a regular plug, while the one going into the garage was a GFCI plug. This GFCI plug was in the middle of the wall in the middle of the door and water heater. I thought it was GFCI because it was close to a water source, but I just read something about having to have this in garages. I read that a you have to have a plug within 6' of a door, and every 6' on the walls. My garage only had this one plug, and then one for the sprinkler system. There is also one in the ceiling for the garage opener. So maybe this isn't the case for a garage?

I need to know what to do with these plugs now, where I should move them to. I am guessing there are specific rules about how electrical can be around a gas line. The closest would be right next to the gas line, but I am guessing that is a no-no. I am planning on framing in the water heater so I can box it in for a cleaner look. At that point I was thinking I might be able to put one one each side of the water heater.

The wire hanging down from the ceiling is just a network cable I had run to that spot.







Thanks,

Chad
 
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Old 08-22-09, 01:20 PM
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Your observations are correct. A garage is not required by the 6/12 rule (6' from a door, 12' between receptacles) The only thing that is required in the garage is one GFCI protected receptacle.

There are no issues running electric next to gas lines.

If you have access to the attic, you may put j-boxed up there and reroute any receptacles that are needed or required by code. I saw your other post and it appears you have a handle on how to do that but I will suggest using remodel boxes to save on any drywall repair. Although it appears you have some anyway so that may no big deal.
 
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Old 08-22-09, 01:28 PM
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Is that MR a turbo?

I truly miss my F3.
 
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Old 08-22-09, 01:45 PM
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Originally Posted by Tolyn Ironhand View Post
Your observations are correct. A garage is not required by the 6/12 rule (6' from a door, 12' between receptacles) The only thing that is required in the garage is one GFCI protected receptacle.

There are no issues running electric next to gas lines.

If you have access to the attic, you may put j-boxed up there and reroute any receptacles that are needed or required by code. I saw your other post and it appears you have a handle on how to do that but I will suggest using remodel boxes to save on any drywall repair. Although it appears you have some anyway so that may no big deal.
Wow, I would have thought will all the little rules they have, the gas lines would be a issue. Guess that why I wasn't really finding anything about it. That cool though, thank you for the help.

When moving those lines around to make them longer I understand I can use a junction box. Do I need a separate one for each splice, or can you have more than one in the box if it works out it is in the right place. Does it matter that it would be two different circuits going through it?
 
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Old 08-22-09, 01:57 PM
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Originally Posted by i6pwr View Post
Is that MR a turbo?

I truly miss my F3.
Yes sir. 91 Turbo with a JDM engine and the basic upgrades that should put it around 260 or so at the wheel. Fun little car but I haven't been driving it as much as I should. I bought the wife a 2002 WRX Wagon, and kinda like driving it more. The MR2 pushes a lot in corners, so it is a more difficult car to drive fast, at least for me.

If your interested in getting another one, let me know. My buddy has a incredible one that he needs to sell. He had built it for his sister to be a show car. Mine is very nice with only 85k on it, but his makes mine look like turd. It is sick how perfect it is.
 
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Old 08-22-09, 02:51 PM
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Nice looking MR2, always been a fan of them. No my F3 was my CBR, figured your screename reflected that, could be wrong.

Parted with her after 10 years.
 
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Old 08-22-09, 03:04 PM
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You can splice multiple circuits in one box as long as there is enough space. You also need to splice the grounds together.
 
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Old 08-25-09, 08:20 PM
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A few other comments:

You only need one GFI receptacle in the garage, but you'll likely want more. Some people end up putting more receptacles and circuits in their garage than there are in the living room

All receptacles need to be GFI protected (either individual GFI devices or run off the load side of one GFI per circuit).

There's no code about an outlet next to a gas line, but I wouldn't put it too close, just because you don't want them getting in the way of each other. (There's no separation requirement because if you have leaking gas, you have bigger problems than just an outlet nearby)

Be careful if framing in your water heater. You'll need air vents (probably 2) which allow a certain amount of square inches of airflow so the combustion has enough oxygen. Also you'll need to be careful of clearance requirements around the heater. Lastly, plan for replacing the water heater at some point in the future. Make sure the door is large enough to get it out and a new one in... and don't make the room so small that the next one you get won't fit!

Good luck!
 
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Old 08-26-09, 06:21 AM
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Hopefully that water heater wasn't on when it was spray painted !

willis
 
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