Phoneline in CAT 5 Home Network

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Old 09-06-09, 01:16 PM
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Phoneline in CAT 5 Home Network

Hi All,

New here! Wondered if anyone could help me out.

I shall be moving into my new house in a couple of months and I plan to do a bit of wiring to create a home network wiring system using cat 5.

I simply wish to know, if you imagine the house is completely empty, and for arguments sake, I fix a 2 x RJ45 socket box in each room and wire them all up in series with cat 5. Then I have a Modem and PC connected to a router in the study room, and the router connected to one of them RJ45 socket's in the study, when I then put a PC in every other room and connect them to the RJ45 socket in their room's with an ethernet cable, will they all connect to that router and see the network, pick up the internet, etc, or does each RJ45 socket have to have it's own single connection back to the router?

Also, if I can run it in series like this and obviously all that would be then is a home network cable system, is there anyway to terminate the phone line coming into the house onto one of them RJ45 sockets and have the phone line running on the same system? E.g. I have 2 x RJ45 sockets in the living room, I connect the PC to one and it finds the network, internet, etc, then I use an RJ11 to RJ45 adaptor to plug my phone into the other one, and it picks up a dial tone?

Here's to hoping, but please tell me it is as straight forward as this, and if so, how do I terminate the incoming phone line into an RJ45 module (RJ11 code is blue - 2, blue/white 5, orange - 3, where do these 3 get terminated on the RJ45 module so all other RJ45 sockets pick up the dial tone?)

Hope I explained this exactly how I'm doing it and for people to understand, any questions please ask and many thanks in advance for your knowledge and help.

Kind regards

Kenny
 
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  #2  
Old 09-06-09, 01:24 PM
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I suggest running a separate data Cat 5 to each location. Not wiring them in series. The voice (phone) you may run in series and would only need Cat 3 but Cat 5 will work too. You can get modular blocks for each faceplate both RJ45 and RJ11 so you will not need any adapter. You can have up to 6 jacks on each faceplate.
 
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Old 09-06-09, 01:38 PM
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Originally Posted by Tolyn Ironhand View Post
I suggest running a separate data Cat 5 to each location. Not wiring them in series. The voice (phone) you may run in series and would only need Cat 3 but Cat 5 will work too. You can get modular blocks for each faceplate both RJ45 and RJ11 so you will not need any adapter. You can have up to 6 jacks on each faceplate.
So you're saying to basically have the socket's in each room all have their own cat 5 which goes back to another socket in the study. So say I have 6 rooms, I need 6 sockets in the study, so 1 socket study to 1 room study, and then connect all 6 of the study sockets to a router?

And you're saying to do the voice as it's own line around the house, not over the data line? Is it not possible to combine the two then? The reason I say about having all RJ45 modules and using an adaptor is cos if you then want the option to use it as a network point instead, you just pull the adaptor out, no re-wiring a new module.
 
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Old 09-06-09, 01:56 PM
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The reason I say run a separate line is because if you ever have more than one thing on your network (computer, Tivo, Game system, etc.) they cannot share a line. It is not idea to mix data with voice in the same cable. 2 pair of the Cat 5 are for data, the other two are for interference.

You could either bring all the cables to the study by the router and modem or you could run them to a closet or basement where you could set up a switch and run one cable to your router. Or run them all to a switch in the study.

I am not sure how the phones are wired in the UK but in the US only the center two connections are used (one pair of wires) and they are either red and green if using Cat 3 or blue and blue/white for Cat 5

Note* I am not a pro for low voltage but we have a few here who are. I'm sure they will have better suggestions then mine*
 
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Old 09-06-09, 06:06 PM
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I'd run all your coax, Ethernet ,and phone home run, not necessarily to the study, but rather a home networing panel, which will house your DSL/Cable modem and router, a master DSL filter if need be, phone and cable splitters. With such a setup, you can connect just the outlets you need ,and to what service (such as two phone lines, or antenna and cable or satellite.
 
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Old 09-07-09, 06:27 AM
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Two of the pairs in a Cat5 cable are not used for data. The T568A wiring standard was created so the cable would be compatible with existing telephone wiring on the modular jacks & plugs. In this scheme, the blue and orange pairs are directly compatible with telephone. T568B has only blue-pair compatibility with telephone.

Besides telephone, other uses for those unused pairs include PoE (power over ethernet, which can power VOIP phones) and video distribution (Z-Band).

As Classicsat said, home-running all cabling to a central location makes future modifications easy. It's called structured wiring.
 
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Old 09-07-09, 06:41 AM
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I'll reiterate the advice already given:

Find somewhere in your house that will work well as a central networking point. Maybe a utility room, closet, garage, etc. where all your network wiring, and telephone can come in and terminate to your network switch and probably cable modem. A closet is a great place for it because it will hide the mess of wires and such.

Typical wiring to each room would be 2 Cat5 cables for network, and 1 Cat5 for telephone. With more and more components becoming network-aware, you'll be happy to run 2 network wires to each location. Also, as stated, you can use cat3 for telephone, but it's usually easier/cheaper just to buy a 500' box of Cat5 wire and run it everywhere.

I wouldn't recommend mixing telephone and data. Telephone wiring uses higher voltages and often creates significant interference in your network wires if they are in the same cable.

If you want to save a few dollars and a few cable runs, you can run two network jacks through one 4-pair Cat5 cable. Normal 100 Base-T wiring only uses 2 pairs of the 4-pair cable. Pins 4/5/7/8 can be used for the second network jack (on both ends of the cable). It won't work with the newer Gig-E standards though, you'll be stuck at 100 Megabit (which is probably sufficient).

This site has a lot of good info:
Tech Info - LAN Wiring and Pinouts

Good luck!
 
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Old 09-07-09, 07:28 AM
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So in short, I can't or shouldn't run voice over the same cable as the network. And I have to run a seperate cable for each rj45 module, they can't be run in series using one cable?

Thank you all
 
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Old 09-07-09, 10:22 AM
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i concur
i wouldn't run you phone over the same cable as data
it limits your flexibility

when i do a house with a SMC ( structured media cabinet )

I run 1 cat 6 ( 2 insulated if you going to stream HDMI video over Cat5/6), one RG6 to each drop ( cable added for those where a coax might or will be needed )

everything then goes back to a central cabinet where i have
modules to punch down the cat6 ( data ), cat5 ( phone) and coax ( goes into a drop amp if there is a lot of coax drops, otherwise a splitter works for a few drops )

from there i bring in one home run from the Cable company to feed the coax network, one phone line to feed all the phone drops, and one cat6 to feed the data network ( i install the modem and router inside or adjacent to the cabinets ) I use the T568A wiring, since residential modules areset up for that standard. T568B is typically used for commercial enviroments.

so as you set up computers / and or phones, it a matter of merely patching into your network with a patch cable and maybe patching inside the SMC where the router and phone block lives.
 
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Old 09-07-09, 10:35 AM
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Originally Posted by mikerios View Post
i concur
I run 1 cat 6 ( 2 insulated if you going to stream HDMI video over Cat5/6), one RG6 to each drop ( cable added for those where a coax might or will be needed )

everything then goes back to a central cabinet where i have
modules to punch down the cat6 ( data ), cat5 ( phone) and coax ( goes into a drop amp if there is a lot of coax drops, otherwise a splitter works for a few drops )
You run 1 Cat 6 for your data? So are you saying you do punch all your RJ45 modules in series from a continuing length of cable?

Or when you say you run 1 cat 6 for your data, do you mean 1 to each module?

Sorry if I'm annoying the hell out of people! lol
 
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Old 09-07-09, 11:07 AM
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Each jack on the keystone would get a cable run back to the central location.

Do not run a-b, b-c, c-d etc.
 
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Old 09-07-09, 02:46 PM
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So in short, phone wise, dropline coming into central location and then branch off continuous length of cat 5 cable, doing all sockets around the house in series.

Network wise, something like a 12 port patch panel in central location, with each module branching off to a seperate network point in the house. Then each module on the patch panel needs an ethernet link to a switch which will also have an ethernet link to your router/modem?

Is the the most compact and accurate way of completing the cycle or is there anything in there I can cut out or do differently?

Thanks for your time people
 
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Old 09-07-09, 03:42 PM
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At least in the US the standard is not to daisy chain phone lines any more. All are home runs to a central point.

Networking wise your plan sounds good.
 
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Old 09-07-09, 06:07 PM
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Residential voice (phone) lines are still daisy chained but a separate line to each location is a better quality job.
 
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