LCDI AMPS - Windows airconditioner

Reply

  #1  
Old 09-10-09, 10:43 AM
K
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Kentucky
Posts: 3
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
LCDI AMPS - Windows airconditioner

I have a Samsung airconditioner that came with a 13amp LCDI cord and I need to replace it...the unit is either 10,500 btu or 11,500 btu.

I ordered an lcdi cable off of ebay but noticed it is only 10amp. Are there any dangers in replacing the 13amp cable with a 10amp cable.

I'm not 100% sure what LCDI is all about and what the amps mean and what is dangerous.

Location: Kentucky, USA
 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 09-10-09, 11:33 AM
ray2047's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 33,597
Received 13 Votes on 11 Posts
I'm not 100% sure what LCDI is all about
It is a safety device to prevent AC fires. The individual conductors have a thin metal mesh over the insulation. Any failure of the individual conductor insulation causes leakage and trips the LCDI.
and what the amps mean and what is dangerous.
Amps is the amount of current it draws. If the AC draws more current then the cord is rated for it can cause a fire. Look on the nameplate of the AC to see what the max amps are.

Using a cord that is rated less then the original would void the UL rating and that is never a good idea.
 
  #3  
Old 09-10-09, 11:46 AM
K
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Kentucky
Posts: 3
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
9.1a

Originally Posted by ray2047 View Post
It is a safety device to prevent AC fires. The individual conductors have a thin metal mesh over the insulation. Any failure of the individual conductor insulation causes leakage and trips the LCDI. Amps is the amount of current it draws. If the AC draws more current then the cord is rated for it can cause a fire. Look on the nameplate of the AC to see what the max amps are.
On the label with the serial number it says 9.1a for the amps.

Yea I definately don't want a fire.
 
  #4  
Old 09-10-09, 12:44 PM
ray2047's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 33,597
Received 13 Votes on 11 Posts
While rules for house wiring and fixture wiring are different if this were a house circuit and load was continuous the the total load could be no greater then 80% of the rated capacity of the wire. The reason on continuous loads (don't know if an AC is) Is that the heat builds up over time and can exceed the heat rating of the insulation. Ok bottom line 80% of 10 amps is 8 amps and AC full load exceeds that. Of course as I said this is speculation applying feeder circuit logic to fixture wiring but I wouldn't risk it.
 
  #5  
Old 09-10-09, 12:50 PM
K
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Kentucky
Posts: 3
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Originally Posted by ray2047 View Post
While rules for house wiring and fixture wiring are different if this were a house circuit and load was continuous the the total load could be no greater then 80% of the rated capacity of the wire. The reason on continuous loads (don't know if an AC is) Is that the heat builds up over time and can exceed the heat rating of the insulation. Ok bottom line 80% of 10 amps is 8 amps and AC full load exceeds that. Of course as I said this is speculation applying feeder circuit logic to fixture wiring but I wouldn't risk it.
Ok i won't risk it.

Thank you for the reply! it is much appreciated
 
Reply
Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: