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If electric space heaters are so dangerous, why don't they.....

If electric space heaters are so dangerous, why don't they.....


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Old 10-08-09, 06:52 AM
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If electric space heaters are so dangerous, why don't they.....

.....at least make the plugs on them so they do not get so hot you can fry an egg on them? What are they thinking?!

I don't even dare run my space heaters on high heat because of this. Even on medium heat, the plug gets hot enough to cause the rubber plug to get soft enough, after say a couple hours, that you can take the spade within it and make it move in the rubber! And that is on medium heat (about 1250 watts -high is 1500).

Yes, the plug is not corroded and fits the outlet real nice and snug.

And you would think that heat could do damage over the long haul to the outlet and wiring in that box, that down the road could cause problems.

It looks like I have to make more phone calls to space heater manufacturers? Aren't they afraid of fires and lawsuits?

Why don't they design them ribbed or of some other material or something, to dissipate the heat?

But even why the heat there? The rest of the cord is ice-cool, to within inches of the plug? Why the plug? Because the cord is thin enough it disipates the heat?, where instead, the plug traps it? But if that is true, then how come I can't feel any heat at all when I squeeze the cord itself?

......................................................................

I see I just hit a 6000 post milestone. Amazing.
 
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Old 10-08-09, 06:59 AM
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materials

Its a compromise selection of materials for both the plug and receptacle. The common metal is brass, which is some 3 to 3.5x times resistive as pure copper. It heats up and the space to work with is limited. (you can't make the blade any thicker or taller).
You might put in a spec grade receptacle where you will use the space heater. That should help.
My company just sent us all an email yesterday banning space heaters in the buildings.
 
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Old 10-08-09, 08:30 AM
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The *same* space heater plug will get hot when plugged into one outlet, but remain cool when plugged into another outlet!

My only experience is an older cheap 59 cent outlet which was wired with 14 gauge wire (15 amp circuit). Space heater plug was quite hot when plugged into this outlet!

Then same space heater plugged into brand new 20 amp commercial grade $3 outlet which was wired to 12 gauge wire (20 amp circuit). Plug was cool after hours of operating on high!

Then there is also how the outlet is wired. Via the push in "back stab" wiring method or wires wrapped around the screws.

Basically heat is caused by a poor connection. The question is, will the plug remain cool if plugged into a $3 commercial grade 15 amp outlet connected to 14 gauge wire with the wires wrapped around the side screws?

Is the heat and poor connection coming from a poor house wiring connection to the outlet? 14 gauge wire? Or a poor connection between the outlet and plug blades?

Basically any poor connection in that area would heat up the metal inside the outlet and this heat would transfer to the plug.

If you experiment, let us know the results please!
 
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Old 10-08-09, 08:40 AM
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Also another way to test/experiment as to the exact problem would be to plug a large gauge extension cord into the outlet, then plug the space heater into that cord.

Then see if the extension cord plug gets hot, but the space heater plug no longer gets hot! Then a definite outlet problem!

Use a large 12 gauge appliance cord. Note that some of these have a lot of insulation on them making them LOOK like they have large gauge wire, but if you look at the label, it is only 14 gauge wire!
 
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Old 10-08-09, 08:58 AM
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Originally Posted by telecom guy View Post
My company just sent us all an email yesterday banning space heaters in the buildings.


Why? Today I think space heaters are designed to shut off when tipped - aren't they? Isn't that a UL thing? I suppose though that if you let any old anybody randomly just plug them in wherever, you never know what some people are thinking - like maybe they will put them so that curtains are hanging in front of them or use lampcord extension cords with them or something.

With me, especially when I leave it on all night on low, -it is the thing with the cord that I think about the most.

Although - I have considered going to one of our energy stores that sells fireplaces, and buy one of those asbestos or like lined panels that you set wood burning stoves on - just to cover my bases.

Being burned alive is not something anybody wants to have happen. Especially at night when you do not klnow what is goign on. That happens to people who smioke in bed. There have been cases where people burn up so completely that they have done tv shows on the possibility that they spontaneously combusted.
 
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Old 10-08-09, 09:06 AM
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Originally Posted by Bill190 View Post
The *same* space heater plug will get hot when plugged into one outlet, but remain cool when plugged into another outlet!

My only experience is an older cheap 59 cent outlet which was wired with 14 gauge wire (15 amp circuit). Space heater plug was quite hot when plugged into this outlet!

Then same space heater plugged into brand new 20 amp commercial grade $3 outlet which was wired to 12 gauge wire (20 amp circuit). Plug was cool after hours of operating on high!

Then there is also how the outlet is wired. Via the push in "back stab" wiring method or wires wrapped around the screws.

Basically heat is caused by a poor connection. The question is, will the plug remain cool if plugged into a $3 commercial grade 15 amp outlet connected to 14 gauge wire with the wires wrapped around the side screws?

Is the heat and poor connection coming from a poor house wiring connection to the outlet? 14 gauge wire? Or a poor connection between the outlet and plug blades?

Basically any poor connection in that area would heat up the metal inside the outlet and this heat would transfer to the plug.

If you experiment, let us know the results please!
Great reply! I am going to check out the stuff you have said in both your posts, and let you know. And not call the company just yet, as I do not want any egg on my face.

If you are right on all this, I think this is info that every person in the country should learn about!!!! How many people would think of this if they plug the appliance into an amp circuit that can handle the wattage, and the plug fits the recepticle securely, and the wire is not back stabbed, and is tightly wrapped to the screws! ???

But what exactly makes the $3 outlet better? Different metal material? If not, then what would make it better? More metal?

Putting in a good grade 20 amp recepticle on the 15 amp line - should I maybe try that?
 
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Old 10-08-09, 09:19 AM
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Originally Posted by ecman51` View Post
:
With me, especially when I leave it on all night on low, -it is the thing with the cord that I think about the most.
given the situation you have described, I would never leave this run without an awake person in the building. The heating you describe is extreme and an effort to remedy it should be sought.


Great reply! I am going to check out the stuff you have said in both your posts, and let you know. And not call the company just yet, as I do not want any egg on my face.
I still would not have a problem contacting the manufacturer. While you may have a problem with your wiring, I would think it would be just as possible the same or other similar problems are found in many other homes. The fact that that type of heater runs on the edge of the limits of the supply of most houses is a great concern.

One of the big problems I see with a 1500 watt heater is, it draws (by calculation) 12.5 amps. On a 15 amp circuit, that is more than the circuit should be exposed to for a continuous load. A 15 amp circuit should not be loaded to more than 12 amps as a continuous load (80% of circuit rating).

a continuous load is considered a load for more than 3 hours.

This, in my opinion, is an engineering defect. They should not be legally allowed to put 15 amp cord plugs on a 1500 watt appliance that will be used as a continuous load. They should be required to use 20 amp cord plugs (the neutral stab is horizontal rather than vertical). As such, it could only be plugged into a nema 5-20 receptacle which should be on a 20 amp circuit.


and you guys think I overkill a build when I insist that all circuits are 20 amp minimum and use #12 wire. I'm telling ya, it's the right way to build.
 
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Old 10-08-09, 09:22 AM
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What hasn't been mentioned is that an electric space heater can, depending on your wiring, cause a fire in your house in places other then where it is being used, the attic, maybe a closet or little used room where the fire won't be noticed till it is too late.. While it is more likely to happen with aluminum wiring I have seen it happen on copper.

Many think a gas space heater is more dangerous because of the open flame but once it is placed safely away from combustibles no real chance of fire unless someone does something really stupid. Oh sure you need to provide adequate oxygen but modern ones have a low oxygen sensor that shuts it down and when used with a CO detector and common sense are safe.
 
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Old 10-08-09, 09:33 AM
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Originally Posted by ecman51` View Post
Why? Today I think space heaters are designed to shut off when tipped - aren't they? Isn't that a UL thing?
Yes they do, but I suspect that most fire related to space heaters are people using them contrary to the UL + manufacturer labeling. Running the cords under rugs, setting the thing behind drapes, overloading circuits, etc.

It's really no different in my mind than that warning on the knife package that says DO NOT CUT FINGERS OFF. For some reason people usually pay attention to that one, but not to the one that says DO NOT USE NEAR FLAMMABLE MATERIAL on the heater.
 
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Old 10-08-09, 09:42 AM
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There was this tenant lady who was not quite right in the mind, and she had her 240 volt electric baseboard heater pinned with her bed and real fluffy bedding fallen down against it, some of which had gone right in by the element.
 
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Old 10-08-09, 09:48 AM
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Originally Posted by ray2047 View Post
What hasn't been mentioned is that an electric space heater can, depending on your wiring, cause a fire in your house in places other then where it is being used, the attic, maybe a closet or little used room where the fire won't be noticed till it is too late.. While it is more likely to happen with aluminum wiring I have seen it happen on copper.
Funny you should mentioned this. I wondered that very thing when they had on our local tv news this morning, how this place went on fire, and the area was in the attic. I thought about maybe a space heater was the culprit with circuit overload/poor wiring/improperly protected circuit, as the cause, since our temps here have suddenly plummeted. Right now as I type, it is only 46 out.
 
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Old 10-08-09, 09:52 AM
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Originally Posted by ibpooks View Post
It's really no different in my mind than that warning on the knife package that says DO NOT CUT FINGERS OFF.
For that reason, they instructed me on how to properly open that hard clear plastic container that my brand new digital(yesterday's big purchase) combo CO and gas detector came in. They told me to cut the top off with a scissors. Often I use my utility like knife. I used the scissors.
 
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Old 10-08-09, 10:00 AM
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Originally Posted by nap View Post
given the situation you have described, I would never leave this run without an awake person in the building. The heating you describe is extreme and an effort to remedy it should be sought.


I still would not have a problem contacting the manufacturer. While you may have a problem with your wiring, I would think it would be just as possible the same or other similar problems are found in many other homes. The fact that that type of heater runs on the edge of the limits of the supply of most houses is a great concern.

One of the big problems I see with a 1500 watt heater is, it draws (by calculation) 12.5 amps. On a 15 amp circuit, that is more than the circuit should be exposed to for a continuous load. A 15 amp circuit should not be loaded to more than 12 amps as a continuous load (80% of circuit rating).

a continuous load is considered a load for more than 3 hours.

This, in my opinion, is an engineering defect. They should not be legally allowed to put 15 amp cord plugs on a 1500 watt appliance that will be used as a continuous load. They should be required to use 20 amp cord plugs (the neutral stab is horizontal rather than vertical). As such, it could only be plugged into a nema 5-20 receptacle which should be on a 20 amp circuit.


and you guys think I overkill a build when I insist that all circuits are 20 amp minimum and use #12 wire. I'm telling ya, it's the right way to build.
Interesting take on it. Thanks.

It makes one wonder what they also were thinking by having 1875 watt hair dryers. Although with those, nobody runs them for too long - unlike space heaters that often are people's sole source for heat.

Considered the people who never paid their winter gas heating bill at all, and get cut off in the spring! So then they are forced to use electric space heaters come next heating season(if they could not drum up hundreds and hundreds of dollars to pay for the past-due bill), and maybe use like 6 of them all over the house, and not know even know if they plug 2 into the same circuit and other horrors.

In general when people are poor and/or make bad decisions, this leads to even more, possibly deadly decisions -unfortunately.
 
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Old 10-08-09, 11:15 AM
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I have a forced air oil furnace, but due the ridiculous price of oil lately I have been using 3 portable 120 volt radiant heaters as backup when it's not too cold. My home insurance company decided to send out an inspector to view my house. He saw the 3 heaters and reported this to the insurance company. They sent me a letter stating they would not renew my insurance. I asked them why? Are they unsafe? If so, how can they sell them? They replied that I am only allowed 2 portable heaters, it's written in the contract (in the small print). If I have more than 2 and the house burns down, I'm probably not covered.
 
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Old 10-08-09, 03:13 PM
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They showed on tv last night the comparative costs for heating with natural gas, propane oil and electric. I think they showed electric. Oil was by far...by FAR, the worsest. So ridiculously so that the difference between NG and oil in 1 year was about what the cost of a smaller NG furnace is (not installation though).

buns,

Are you able to take advantage of time of use elctric rates?

I wonder what the rationale is from going from 2 to 3? Odds of more mistakes? Odds of putting 2 or 3 heaters all on the same circuit? They had that in the fine print, eh? It pays to read policies I guess. If you never saw that fine print and your house DID burn down, and then after the fact, the insurance company showed you that clause, in writing - THAT would be rather disheartening - maddening, actually. See those 'fine print' ads that are on tv right now, where the man will not let the kid have or keep playing with the real item, and substitutes some piece of junk instead?.
 
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Old 10-08-09, 04:40 PM
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They showed on tv last night the comparative costs for heating with natural gas, propane oil and electric. I think they showed electric. Oil was by far...by FAR, the worsest. So ridiculously so that the difference between NG and oil in 1 year was about what the cost of a smaller NG furnace is (not installation though).
Had a customer in a very upscale neighborhood. He off course had central heat and AC. I was amazed to see kerosene heaters in the house. I couldn't help asking they seemed so out of place. He explained that the heat was electric and after seeing a one month bill he went into shock. No gas in the neighborhood so he went to kerosene. A 55 gallon drum lasted him all winter and cost less then a months electric heat.

No not suggesting it is sane or prudent to heat with kerosene just saying yes electric can be expensive. What a lot of people I have talked to don't realize is that heat pumps or only good to a certain temperature then electric resistant heat cuts in. Ok I know in some places backup is gas but not so often here.
 
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Old 10-08-09, 04:54 PM
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Of course the kero heater guy isn't taking into account the staining and buildup on walls and trim. I did that once cause it was nice and warm in the rooms we used it.... ONCE.
 
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Old 10-08-09, 05:58 PM
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Fuel oil prices have jumped all over the place. At the given time, since electric rates have been fairly stable, the fuel oil cost was more. Can't say that always is the case though. Easy enough if one has the time to do btu comparisons on each heating type.
 
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Old 10-08-09, 06:11 PM
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That one part I am not too crazy due I have oil heat in my house and shop and to make it worst I have common fuel that will be used with my diesel trucks so I have to use on road ULSD fuel not the offroad verison.

As for Natural Gaz that is out of my question due one company asked me to hook up and they want total cost of over $4500 so right now I have plan to install wood boiler to heat the house and shop due I can able get a bunch of scrap wood without issue.

For Electric heat yes I have in only couple spots but they are only used for frezze protection that it { pump control room and generator room and office bathroom }

Merci,Marc

P.S. of course I forgot to add this I do have two diesel generators that I can use during power outage { it happend semi frequiet to my spot }
 

Last edited by french277V; 10-08-09 at 06:26 PM. Reason: add one more info
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Old 10-08-09, 06:23 PM
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Our gas rates just went down by a lot and everyone will be getting a monthly refund for a few months.

Of course almost everyone uses gas here because of the cost and no outages due to storms. Even in the case of a very rare electrical outage (everything underground), my direct vent gas fireplace will keep the house reasonable without power for a day or two and I could also rig up my generator for the fans if necessary.
 
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Old 10-08-09, 06:31 PM
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french277 -

What part of WI were you located in? I thought most of the state was mainly gas unless you were out a ways, but you never know when you venture into the Republic of Wisconsin. If you are in France now (the use of "gaz" instead of "gas" is a hint), that could be a hook-up problem that is costly to overcome.

Say hi to my friend Didier (also known as DDA) who lives southwest of downtown Paris when he is home. - He is 5' 5" and his wife is a blond 5' 11" Texan. What a combination the kids are (French, Sicilian, English and Norwegian) when they go to Normandy (settled by the Norsemen) for the wine and cheese festivals. I keep trying to find an excuse to get there at the right time.

Dick
 
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Old 10-08-09, 06:35 PM
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I think you may be barking up the wrong tree by complaining to the portable heater manufacturer.
The ones to get spanked are the approval agencies.
These heaters get approved for short term unattended use but know that they are commonly used as a permanent heat source.
They give the makers permission to sell them!

I use these portable heaters quite often but cut the cord caps off and install heavy duty ones and throw out the heaters after a couple of years.
With a heavy duty cord cap and a receptacle in good condition there is no heat at the plug.
 
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Old 10-08-09, 06:47 PM
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Originally Posted by Concretemasonry View Post
french277 -

What part of WI were you located in? I thought most of the state was mainly gas unless you were out a ways, but you never know when you venture into the Republic of Wisconsin. If you are in France now (the use of "gaz" instead of "gas" is a hint), that could be a hook-up problem that is costly to overcome.
Dick.,
In Northeast wisconsin where I am located near Appleton area however yeah majorty of Wisconsin do have Natural Gaz but in few area there is none of them I know in Northwest Wisconsin area do not have it so they used Propane Gaz instead. ditto with far north area unless you are next to one of the city then good chance you can get Natrual Gaz.

Yeah My shop and home in Wisconsin they did ran new Natrual gaz supply next to me but they try to stiff me with the hook up charge and what more all the oil burning units are very effiect and pretty new and I don't think I feel spending over 5000 Euros { Dollars to North America freinds } to reconferated the units and return of investment is is slim.

Now in France we do have natural gaz supply in major cities but small town it kinda mixed bag it can be Natural gaz or gazoil { diesel fuel } kinda like 60/40 split out of country but the natural gaz price is pretty wild ride due the Europeans get most of natural gaz from Russian area and last couple of years we did have spike on price and almost have gaz shortage due they control the price.
Will see what happend this year maybe calm down a little.

Say hi to my friend Didier (also known as DDA) who lives southwest of downtown Paris when he is home. - He is 5' 5" and his wife is a blond 5' 11" Texan. What a combination the kids are (French, Sicilian, English and Norwegian) when they go to Normandy (settled by the Norsemen) for the wine and cheese festivals. I keep trying to find an excuse to get there at the right time.

Dick
If I do see them I will say Bonjour to them for ya.

Merci,Marc
 
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Old 10-08-09, 07:08 PM
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French -

My friend's wife was a U.S. citizen and it cost about $2500 to take the required courses to get a French/Euro drivers license after driving on a U.S. license for years in France - they were not surprised.

That is not surprising when you go to a restaurant near Notre Dame and have to step over the owner's dog in the dining room (the dog may really have been the cleanest thing in the old basement restaurant, but the food was great). Traveling is wonderful - A great place to see and go through to other great places (I enjoy traveling to everywhere, no matter where because they are all great and unique).

Many miles were logged on NW flight 50 from Detroit to Paris (second only to the Detroit to Amsterdam flight #1 destination) and the $60 cab ride into Paris - they make the language problems difficult to please the locals businesses, but most drivers are interesting no matter they are French or Pakistani.

That is enough of this off-topic rambling!

Dick
 
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Old 10-09-09, 12:36 AM
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ONE WORD!! EDENPURE!! Super space heater. I have 2 now, and have yet to turn on my heat which is oil forced air! Have one downstairs and upstairs. You can leave them on 24/7 if you want.
 
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Old 10-09-09, 04:27 AM
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In most cases running a space heater on low will heat the space. It will just tke a bit longer. The savings on the electric bill over time will be significant, and the electrical system won't come close to overloading.

On a 15-amp circuit, drawing 750 watts (low power) is a whole lot less dangerous than 1500 (high power).
 
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Old 10-09-09, 08:47 AM
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Originally Posted by Rick Johnston View Post
In most cases running a space heater on low will heat the space. It will just tke a bit longer. The savings on the electric bill over time will be significant, and the electrical system won't come close to overloading.

On a 15-amp circuit, drawing 750 watts (low power) is a whole lot less dangerous than 1500 (high power).
but Rick, we want heat and we want it NOW!!!

We never like to wait for anything, dang it!!


Yes, Rick has a point. Rather than trying to have instant heat, a lower setting will often do what you want but it will need to be used more as a maintenance heat rather than a quick heat use.
 
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Old 10-09-09, 08:59 AM
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As to certain outlets being better, here is Leviton's brochure on "industrial grade" outlets. Quite a bit to this...

http://www.leviton.com/OA_HTML/ibcGe...45EC5F6B511E95
 
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Old 10-09-09, 09:12 AM
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P.S. I mentioned above about the wires going to the outlet via the back or "back stab" method.

On cheap outlets, the wire is held in by a spring loaded piece of metal. Very poor connection!

The "industrial grade" outlets also have a hole in the back to insert the wire HOWEVER you tighten down the screws on the sides of the outlet to clamp the wire in place. This method is far superior to the above spring loaded method. More metal contact and you tighten the connection with a screw. A tight connection is a much better connection.
 
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Old 10-09-09, 10:28 AM
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I agree with everything that is being said.So instead of talking about this issue why don't we do something about it. We all can educate people in different ways. We can't do it all so get with someone in office and start telling them the problems. All it takes is a few people to get the word out and it will take off after that. I've have worked with several different companies and all the time I try to educate them in someway or another from what I have learned. Even found a company that their wiring was under subpar to a device. The main wire that controlled the device was under rated just like the heaters we have been talking about. I bugged them for some time and they finally changed the wiring to hold the load. They actually thank me for it. Anyway all we can do as common people is to let everyone about issues like this.
Jim
 
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Old 10-09-09, 05:12 PM
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Will 168 degrees fry the egg?

On medium heat last night after only about 1/2 hour, that is what the plug said on my IR thermometer. Can you imagine if I put it to high, for any length of time? And to think someone might actually leave something like that on, and leave the house?

I see there are tons of posts since my last visit. Going to read every last one of them now.

Also, this weekend, I plan on checking out the outlet and buying 12 ga. shorty extension cord and try to plug heater into it, and see, as advised. Will by better grad otulet if need be. I do love experimenting. Can't wait to see if I can improve on what I have going right now. Glad I am not in heaven yet so I can have problems that are fun to try to fix.
 
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Old 10-09-09, 05:24 PM
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Originally Posted by GregH View Post
These heaters get approved for short term unattended use but know that they are commonly used as a permanent heat source.
They give the makers permission to sell them!
That sia crazy way to design something, if you even have to presume or ask people to not use them al the time, fi they want to. Are they sleeping on the job, or what?

I use these portable heaters quite often but cut the cord caps off and install heavy duty ones and throw out the heaters after a couple of years.
With a heavy duty cord cap and a receptacle in good condition there is no heat at the plug.
What do you suppose causes the imporovemnt with the new retrofitted plug? If you are using the same gauge wire, and they(the factory) had all the strands on their spades, then how does one improve on that? Or if you disect the factory plug, are they constructed sloppily where not all the strands of wire are attached to the spade?, or what?

On the replacement plugs you have put on, are they larger and maybe have more surface area to disipate the heat? But that seems unlkely because the cord itself does not get hot, and that has nothing on it but a little rubber.
 
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Old 10-09-09, 05:30 PM
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Stay with me on this!

Originally Posted by diyplank View Post
ONE WORD!! EDENPURE!! Super space heater. I have 2 now, and have yet to turn on my heat which is oil forced air! Have one downstairs and upstairs. You can leave them on 24/7 if you want.
I would like you to periodically update us on how they work as the temps get cold, if you'd be so kind.

Right now all you really need to do is take the chill off. Maybe warm up the room(s) a few degrees. Wait til the cold really hits. Then let us know if "warm heat" is what they crack it up to be.
 
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Old 10-09-09, 05:39 PM
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Originally Posted by Rick Johnston View Post
In most cases running a space heater on low will heat the space. It will just tke a bit longer. The savings on the electric bill over time will be significant, and the electrical system won't come close to overloading.

On a 15-amp circuit, drawing 750 watts (low power) is a whole lot less dangerous than 1500 (high power).
I know. That is what I'm banking on when I sleep with it on, set to that watts (confirmed by my watt-hour meter.) And the cord and plug stay cool.

But last night..... My feet froze in bed, and I had to put on my iceskating socks, my wool-like shirt-jac, and long underwear - and even at that, get up and turn on the furnace - and woke up with my heart beating about 150 because the bedroom hit at least 85 degrees, with those 2 things on!

I am still trying to figure out why last night was much different than the night before, when it was low 30's out and all I needed was that cube heater and my skivies on. And one night we had heavy frost and 24 out, and all I was using was that cube heater. That is really a good one (to try to figure out).
 
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Old 10-09-09, 07:27 PM
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My brother recently bought an all electric house. He intends to switch to gas heat and hot water. I think he got a quote for $8000 for the furnace and ducting. The gas hookup is supposed to be cheap, less that $600 for sure.

I use a dual wattage heater on 750w mode to keep the computer area not so cold.
 
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Old 10-09-09, 11:16 PM
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ecman,
Wind can steal heat from a house. Was it windy last night and relatively calm the night before? What about the humidity? Dry air feels colder than moist air.

Did you measure the temp, or did you just feel cold? Don't overlook that human factor. An active day will keep you warm naturally for hours because circulation is robust -- and carries into the night -- while a sedentary day will lower your metabolism and cause the extremeties to feel cold due to poor circulation.

Coffee or tea one night will warm you. A few beers the next night will freeze the feets.

What, if anything, changed between last night and the night before?
 
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Old 10-10-09, 07:01 AM
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I think Rick pretty much said it all!
These tests are very interesting but in all honesty do not in any way reflect the effectiveness of different types of heaters.
When setting up to do a heater "experiment" try this....... do as few as 10 jumping jacks, 10 sit ups and run on the spot for 30 seconds and then see how you "feel" about a particular heat source.

I do the HVAC in a hospital of 350 people and I am honestly not interested in anyone's "feelings" when it comes to temperature complaints.
They all know to give me the actual temperature in their area where I will then measure the humidity and only then make an adjustment if necessary.
I all honesty it is sometimes a zoo.
A person at one nursing station will complain that it is too cold while someone at the other end of the counter is putting in a work order saying it is too hot!!!
 
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Old 10-10-09, 07:35 AM
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Originally Posted by GregH View Post

I do the HVAC in a hospital of 350 people and I am honestly not interested in anyone's "feelings" when it comes to temperature complaints.
They all know to give me the actual temperature in their area where I will then measure the humidity and only then make an adjustment if necessary.
I all honesty it is sometimes a zoo.
A person at one nursing station will complain that it is too cold while someone at the other end of the counter is putting in a work order saying it is too hot!!!
dummy thermostats Greg, dummy thermostats. Solves most of the problems. They adjust all they want and nothing ever changes but they sure think it has.
 
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Old 10-10-09, 12:52 PM
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Originally Posted by diyplank View Post
ONE WORD!! EDENPURE!! Super space heater. I have 2 now, and have yet to turn on my heat which is oil forced air! Have one downstairs and upstairs. You can leave them on 24/7 if you want.

I was considering getting an electric fireplace, but these seem to do a better job. Only problem is, they are 110 Volt and draw 12 amps, just like the space heaters. I could not find any electric fireplaces that run on 220 Volt.

I guess it's possible to hardwire a 110 V heater. Anyone know if "Code" allows the use of stranded wire on a wall receptacle? If not, I'm sure it would be easy to rewire it using solid copper.
 
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Old 10-10-09, 10:51 PM
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Originally Posted by bunsorama View Post
I guess it's possible to hardwire a 110 V heater. Anyone know if "Code" allows the use of stranded wire on a wall receptacle? If not, I'm sure it would be easy to rewire it using solid copper.
Are you talking about replacing the power cord with romex and hard-wiring it to a receptacle? Bad idea! Not only is it against code, it will void the UL listing and may also void your insurance coverage.
 
 

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