outlet ground issue

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Old 10-08-09, 08:19 AM
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outlet ground issue

We are getting a 2nd floor put on our home, and we had the final electrical inspection yesterday. All of the new work passed of course, as well as all of the new lighting and everything else that is int ehhouse, except for about 8 outlets on the 1st floor, they failed due to a lack of continuity of ground, so I am guessing they had no ground. I checked the wiring in the basement, where the wires go up into the walls and the boxes, and they are the metal shielded cable with 2 wires, black and white, there is no ground in there. I see that most of these wires are like this, so I am wondering what my options are. I could rewire everyhing with new romex and that would solve it, but there are 2 outlets I cant get to so I am not sure how I would fix them. Any ideas or thoughts as to what I could do so I can passs inspection and move back in? I can pay the electrician to do it, but that wouldnt be for another 2 weeks, and I am just so broke froall of the work that I have done, I just cant afford any more work at this point. Once we pass this, we can have our final inspection and move back in. 17 weeks later.
 
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Old 10-08-09, 09:22 AM
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Originally Posted by aschwartz71 View Post
they are the metal shielded cable with 2 wires, black and white, there is no ground in there.
There is no ground wire, but is there a bonding strip? It's a thin metal strip that runs inside the spiral sheath and is usually wrapped around the box connector where the cable terminates?

I see that most of these wires are like this, so I am wondering what my options are. I could rewire everyhing with new romex and that would solve it,
If there is no bonding strip then rewiring is usually the best option. You would be allowed to fish just a ground wire to the boxes, however it's often no more difficult to just fish the romex and have new wiring since you're doing the labor anyway.

but there are 2 outlets I cant get to so I am not sure how I would fix them.
You can always get to them, but not always easy.

Any ideas or thoughts as to what I could do so I can passs inspection and move back in?
Usually existing construction is not inspected during an addition. Is there a local requirement for this or some other reason they're looking at the old stuff? Perhaps a conversation with the inspector about what is required for existing structure?
 
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Old 10-08-09, 09:41 AM
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There are two ways I do not recommend but might satisfy the inspector. Install a GFCI receptacle at first in line and mark all GFCI protected No equipment ground. If the house is old enough you might be able to invoke the Grandfather clause and replace all with ungrounded receptacles.

Of course first I'd want to make my own check to see if they are really ungrounded. It could also be there is a "Romex Splice" ahead of theres nine that was not properly done. Look at all boxes on the breaker including lights and switches to see if there is any Romex.
 
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Old 10-08-09, 10:10 AM
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I have to check for the bonding strip, I didnt know about that. I guess I have to start at the panel, and work my way out and replace what I can, until I get to where I cant see it anymore, and then hope it will work, otherwise I will need to fish the wire thru the wall and the box. it will be a pain I believe, but not impossible. Just another delay, thats all..

thanks for the info.
 
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Old 10-08-09, 11:19 AM
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What type of testing procedure was used to determine a "No-Ground" condition at the receptacle outlet-boxes?; or was the N-G condition simply based on the fact that the receptacles are 2-slot, non-Grounding type receptacles?.
 
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Old 10-08-09, 11:52 AM
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not certain what testing he did, I was just told by my GC. THe outlets are new, I just replaced them with new standard (15a) outlets

I need to check the outlets tonite and see how they are interconnected, also, I couldn't find my little tester yesterday, so I havent checked myself yet. I want to see what the reading is before I start to redo stuff.
 
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Old 10-08-09, 12:36 PM
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just replaced them with new standard (15a) outlets
Were the receptacles you removed grounded or ungrounded (2 prong). Did the boxes have a green pigtail from the box to the receptacle? If not you need one or use self grounding receptacles. The old ones may not have had a pigtail because they were self grounding.

No an expert but even old style BX without a bond strap should show some ground if continuous to panel.
 

Last edited by ray2047; 10-08-09 at 12:55 PM.
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