A few questions on rough in

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Old 10-19-09, 12:05 PM
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A few questions on rough in

Hello all,

I am wiring my new detached garage, and have a few questions. I am definitely a rookie, so I apologize in advance if the questions are unclear.

1.) For the receptacles, do I have to pig tail all the wires, or can I just pig tail the grounds, and daisy-chain out the wires from the outlets?

2.) Are barrel crimp connectors still legal for bonding the grounds under NEC 2008?

3.) For the two outdoor GFI outlets, do I HAVE to use those ugly bubble covers?

Thanks in advance!!
 
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Old 10-19-09, 12:13 PM
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Originally Posted by DigitalFusion View Post
can I just pig tail the grounds, and daisy-chain out the wires from the outlets?
Yes that is allowed.

Are barrel crimp connectors still legal for bonding the grounds under NEC 2008?
Yes as long as you use the correct crimping tool according to the package on the barrels. Some can use just plain pliers or linesmans, but others need a special tool.

For the two outdoor GFI outlets, do I HAVE to use those ugly bubble covers?
Yes. There are some collapsible bubble covers that don't stick out so much. I don't know if the big boxes carry them, but the electrical supply house should carry a couple different types.
 
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Old 10-19-09, 12:18 PM
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wow, thanks for the fast repsonse!


What is the proper method of crimping the grounds? Do I twist one shorter length around a longer one, then crimp and connect the long lead to the recepticle (after rough-in inspection) or is there a better way?




BTW- this forum is confusing. The replies are backwards with the newest at the top!
 
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Old 10-19-09, 01:24 PM
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Originally Posted by DigitalFusion View Post
Do I twist one shorter length around a longer one, then crimp and connect the long lead to the recepticle (after rough-in inspection) or is there a better way?
That is acceptable. If you don't leave one long you can just add a 6" piece to the bundle and attach that to the receptacle.

The replies are backwards with the newest at the top!
There are pull-downs at the top of the thread that allows you to sort newest or oldest first, linear or threaded views.
 
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Old 10-19-09, 06:17 PM
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This is only my opinion from a fellow Minnesotan: I have worked/wired many houses and have only ran into the crimp type ground connectors once. They are just not used around here and for good reason. I speak from experience that they are a MAJOR pain in the rear end if you ever have to remove one if you have to add another cable or make a mistake. I highly recommend NOT using them. Instead I suggest using the green wire nuts that have a hole in the end for making your grounding pigtail. That or just plain wire nuts.
 
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Old 10-20-09, 10:57 AM
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Thanks for all the replies everyone!

I'll check out Menards and look for those green wire nuts that you speak of. They sound pretty slick!
 
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Old 10-26-09, 01:56 PM
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I picked up some of the green ties with the holes in the end. I am nearing the point where I am ready to call and have my inspection scheduled. Since it is only a recording that I call to schedule the inspection, I cannot ask a few questions I need answers to. Specificaly, what they want to see on the rough-in inspection.

I have all the boxes fed with wire, stripped back, the grounds bonded together, and the wires pushed back into the box. I have all the feeds at the panel stripped, labeled, and ready to go, but not connected to the box at all. There are no breakers in the box. There is no main feed coming into the box. Its still rolled up in the trench next to the garage.

1.) Do I need to bring the main feed into the building for the rough-in?

2.) Do I need to do anything else to the panel?

3.) Are there any common issues I should look for before I call for the inspection?
 
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Old 10-26-09, 02:06 PM
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Originally Posted by DigitalFusion View Post
1.) Do I need to bring the main feed into the building for the rough-in?
Generally no.

2.) Do I need to do anything else to the panel?
Generally no. It can't hurt to terminate your grounds on the panel ground bus.

3.) Are there any common issues I should look for before I call for the inspection?
Most inspectors want to see all of the grounds made up at each junction box with wirenuts or crimps and also bonded to the boxes if they are metal. You do not have to make up hot and neutral splices, but I generally do just because it's easier before the rock is up.
 
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Old 10-26-09, 02:32 PM
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excellent. Thanks for the fast response!

I have to run my feed for the 240V outlet. It is going to be for a future purchase air compressor. I took a look at several 240V compressors, and saw that most of them only draw 15 amps. If I put a 20a breaker in the panel, can I just use the 12-2 wire I have left over? I was told by an electrician that I do not need 3 wire, since it is only for an air compressor, and therefore am not required to have the neutral?
 
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Old 10-26-09, 04:21 PM
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As long as the compressor is straight 240 volt you will not need a neutral. AFAIK I have never seen a 120/240 compressor.
 
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Old 10-26-09, 04:37 PM
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I believe that the trade name for the barrel connectors you talk about is called Buchanan nuts or caps.

As you can see, the crimping pliers are quite expensive.

Crimpers: AMP & Ratchet

In industrial applications where you make hundreds of connections that are a one time application, the crimp on cap is several times cheaper then the standard twist on wire nut and the crimp on cap does not come loose in time.

The down side is that it is not service removable.

Here is the ones that I use for do it yourself wiring jobs around the house.

IDEAL INDUSTRIES, INC. - Twist-on Wire Connectors
 
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