Installing a wall heater

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Old 11-03-09, 01:05 PM
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Installing a wall heater

I plan to install a wall heater (Broan 170) in the master bathroom just under the light switches. I plan to use the 120v models and want to wire it from the light switch above it. The bathroom circuit (20 amps) has 3 vanity lights, a light/vent, and 5 plugs. I also want to install an electronic timer (Leviton 612-6260m-00w). Would like to know if anyone has any opinions, advice, or concerns before I start?
 
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Old 11-03-09, 01:21 PM
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Would like to know if anyone has any opinions, advice, or concerns before I start?
Opinion 1: Don't do it. The heater will use almost the full capacity of the existing breaker. You literally couldn't use the heater a hair dryer and lights at the same time. for more then a few minuets. The heater should be on a dedicated circuit.

Opinion 2: The switch may not have a neutral. If so you couldn't power the heater from it anyway.

Above assumes the usual 750/1500 watt heater and comments are based on the heater running on high.
 
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Old 11-03-09, 01:30 PM
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Originally Posted by cyber99 View Post
I plan to install a wall heater (Broan 170) in the master bathroom just under the light switches. I plan to use the 120v models and want to wire it from the light switch above it. The bathroom circuit (20 amps) has 3 vanity lights, a light/vent, and 5 plugs. I also want to install an electronic timer (Leviton 612-6260m-00w). Would like to know if anyone has any opinions, advice, or concerns before I start?
Concerns: Does this one circuit run everything, lights/vent, and outlets in the bathroom? Does it just feed the ONE bathroom? What is on the other plugs?

Are you going to use this heater at 500 or 1000 watts?

Opinion: It needs to be on it's own circuit. If you plug in a typical hair dryer (1875 watts) and have the heater on, you're going to be in the dark very soon.

1875 watts hair dryer
1000 watts heater
180 watts (3x60 watt) lighting
60 watt vent fan
3115 watts total on a 2400 watt MAX circuit. Even at 500 watts, you'd be over.

Advice: put it on it's own circuit. If it was me I'd run it on 240 if I could too.
 
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Old 11-03-09, 01:56 PM
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Thank you for the responses. I understand the concerns about the total wattage. I will have to double check what is on that circuit. I know my wife has used the hair dryer and a 1500 watt space heater at the same time without a problem. That was why i was going with a 1000w. Nothing else is plugged in at this time. If it is detirmined that they are on separate circuits (lights/plugs) would I be ok? Is it ok to attach the heater to a timer?
 
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Old 11-03-09, 03:16 PM
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The timer should be rated for 1500 watts or greater.
know my wife has used the hair dryer and a 1500 watt space heater at the same time without a problem.
Breakers are slow to trip when you take them just over the designed limit but as they heat up they will trip. Your new heater electric supply should not be designed on past luck but good engineering. Also continued heating of the wires insulation could cause eventual failure.
 
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