Adding an arc fault receptacle

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Old 11-15-09, 07:02 PM
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Adding an arc fault receptacle

I have been asked about adding a receptacle to a bedroom that has older ungrounded receptacles.
Would adding a grounded, arc fault protected receptacle to a bedroom affect the code compliance of the existing ungrounded ones.
 
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Old 11-15-09, 08:07 PM
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Are you talking about an Arc fault (AFCI) or ground fault (GFCI) receptacle? I ask because I have not seen any arc fault receptacles on the market yet. Only breakers.

As far as adding the new receptacle, It would have to ACFI protected by 2005 code. I would think the other circuit, if left untouched, would be grandfathered in. But it would really be up to the AHJ.
 
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Old 11-15-09, 08:43 PM
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I've not seen any AFCI outlets either. Just GFCI.

When you say "code compliance", that could mean many different things...

Sometimes when doing major remodeling work, the local electrical inspector will require certain things to be "brought up to code". If anything like this, ask your local electrical inspector what would be allowed as rules can be different in different locations.

Or it may be a child day care situation and some agency wants certain things done to the electrical system (for the safety of the children). If something like that, get the exact wording of their requirements.

Or it could be a house for sale and might get a certain financing if the house meets certain "conditions". Again get exact wording of what they want.

Insurance requirements...

Etc.

So far as safety goes, installing a GFCI outlet at the first outlet so all the other outlets down stream were also connected to that outlet, then this would make the outlets in the room safer. (Apply sticker that the outlet is not grounded.)

And if you wanted to install a 3 prong outlet without a building ground, then the proper way to do that would be to install a GFCI outlet and place the sticker on it indicating that the outlet is not grounded.

But for "being up to code" in a bedroom, this would pretty much require an AFCI circuit breaker, grounded wiring and child tamper resistant grounded outlets. (Can't stick metal objects into outlets.) But again electrical codes vary locally. Check with your local electrical inspector.
 
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Old 11-15-09, 08:44 PM
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I agree with Scott. Anything added would need to meet the currect code requirements.

Ungrounded circuits are not supposed to be extended.

AFAIK the AFCI receptacle and the unicorn have something in common. Both are written about but have never been seen by anyone.
 
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Old 11-15-09, 09:10 PM
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Ya, I guess I wasn't too clear.

I had said "an arc fault protected receptacle", meaning a new receptacle supplied by an arc fault breaker.

My question was if a new arc fault protected receptacle was installed in a bedroom with ungrounded outlets and they were not touched, would they still be legal.

Ultimately I will have to ask the inspector.
 
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Old 11-16-09, 09:27 AM
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Yes they should be okay as long as the existing circuit is left as-is.
 
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Old 11-16-09, 04:12 PM
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Originally Posted by ibpooks View Post
Yes they should be okay as long as the existing circuit is left as-is.
This is my opinion as well, but your AHJ may have a different view.
 
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Old 11-17-09, 10:01 AM
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If you run a new circuit, then that circuit alone would need to be AFCI. If you extended the existing one, the whole circiut would need AFCI protection in order to cover your new recep.

Thanks!
Jim
 
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