220v Outlet used for Air Compressor

Reply

  #1  
Old 12-06-09, 01:46 PM
H
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Ohio
Posts: 8
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
220v Outlet used for Air Compressor

I was wondering if it was ok to us a dryer 220v outlet for an Air compressor.

The compressor specs are 60Gal / 3.7(running hp) / 220v / 15.0 amp / 60Hz / Phase 1.

The dryer that is currently being used on the outlet is listed for the following wire specs.
120/240v - 60Hz - 5600w - 24 amp - 3 Wire
120/208v - 60Hz - 4400w - 22 amp - 3 Wire
(at least thats what the sticker says)

The reason I'm asking is I was going to wire a new line to the circuit breaker box but I have no open breaker spaces available, so I'm looking for an alternate way. BTW do not plan on using the compressor and the dryer at the same time, just unplug one to use the other.

Any info would be great.
 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 12-06-09, 02:12 PM
ray2047's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 33,583
Received 13 Votes on 11 Posts
You may be able to use tandem breakers in your panel to free up space. Please post make and model number and one of the pros can advise.
 
  #3  
Old 12-06-09, 07:13 PM
H
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Ohio
Posts: 8
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Ye, someone had mention some tandem breaker set-up, I was thinking since the laundry room and the garage are back to back ...... literally the air compressor and the dryer are back to back. I figured the dryer recepticle would be easier to plug into than running wires and expanding the breaker box.

It seems as simple as connecting a wire dryer plug to the compressor and plugging in?
 
  #4  
Old 12-06-09, 07:41 PM
F
Member
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Wet side of Washington state.
Posts: 18,495
Received 35 Votes on 27 Posts
Are you proposing to unplug the dryer and plug the compressor into the same receptacle every time you want to use the compressor? If yes, then this might be marginally acceptable although I don't condone it. You would need to use a flexible cable of at least 10-3 construction rated for at least 300 volts. Your compressor motor would absolutely need to have the proper overload protection.

However, if what you are wanting to do is to connect a new receptacle in the garage to the dryer receptacle this is absolutely not acceptable.

Nor is it acceptable to just make a hole in the wall separating the garage and laundry room and pass the compressor power cable through. Walls between garages and living spaces need to meet specific building codes for fire resistance.
 
  #5  
Old 12-06-09, 07:42 PM
ray2047's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 33,583
Received 13 Votes on 11 Posts
In the user manual what size breaker does the manufacturer of the compressor recommend?* Is the dryer circuit 3 wire or 4 wire?**

*If the manufacturer requires a 20 amp circuit you shouldn't run it on a 30a circuit.

**If this is an old style three wire non metallic cable setup with just a black, red, and white and no green or bare you don't have a legal ground for the compressor.
 
  #6  
Old 12-06-09, 09:35 PM
H
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Ohio
Posts: 8
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
That's part of my problem .... the info that came with the compressor is extremely vague (Kobalt 60gal). The unit did not come with a cord so I have to add an extension myself.

The book sates under "electrical wiring" to refer to the label for voltage and amperage requirements (which is listed in my original post). Then it says for best performance and reliable starting to use a dedicated circuit, a circuit breaker is recommended, if the circuit is protected by a fuse, use dual element time delay fuses (Buss Fusetron type "T" only)

"FOR MODELS SHIPPED WITHOUT POWER CORD" must be connected to a grounded metallic, permanent wiring system, or an equipment grounding terminal or lead on the product.

It does mention several times about grounding is important (which is a given), and it does specify if an extension cord has to be used, then the cord should be no longer than 50ft and a minimum wire size of 12 (do not use 16 or 14 guage extension cord) only use a 3-wire extension cord that has a 3 blade grounding plug and a 3 slot receptacle that will accept the plug.

Then it shows me a pic of 2 plugs (115v/15amp and 230v/15amp both with matching receptacles, 115v is a dual plug receptacle and the 230v is a single)

It really doesn't give me a prefered breaker or amperage note.

Also keep in mind this compressor is not a daily used item, it will be used about twice a month so unplugging the dryer and plugging in the compressor is no big deal, I do understand that running the extension thru the wall may not be the best thing to do.

Also keep in mind my home is only 4 years old so from what i'm told it is up to code.
 
  #7  
Old 12-06-09, 09:52 PM
F
Member
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: NE Wis / Paris France{ In France for now }
Posts: 4,807
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Let me step in a minute .,

Kobat compressor that do ring the bell to me if my memory serve me right those motor do have thermal protection switch or button on one end of the motor itself.

That will look like red square or round button.

Now the next question is how far is your load centre is from the garage wall ? if pretty short distance it is not super hard to run the new cable to proper receptale { this is the safest methold to do this anyway }

4 year old home that is pretty new and IMO they should have spare breaker slot in the load centre.

Can you run the breaker model number if possible so one of us can able tell you if that possible to use the twinner to move one circuit over and put a double pole breaker or quad breaker in there { all it depending on what model load centre it is }

Is your basement is finshed or just open unfinshed basement if unfinished it will be very easy to run the new circuit to the garage.

I know you mention attached garage so that will make it eaiser however there is other option you may want to think about is put a subpanel in garage which it is a common option as well.

The reason why I mention subpanel in Garage due you can able add few more circuits like air compressor or welder etc.,,



Merci,Marc
 
  #8  
Old 12-06-09, 10:17 PM
H
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Ohio
Posts: 8
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Yes, this compressor is brand new and it does have a protection button.

Actually the sub-panel idea seems like a better plan. I did finished the basement 2 years ago, so I'm familiar with 110 wiring and code. when I finished the basement I did use the open breaker spots so the panel is full.

It does have a drop ceiling, so wiring shouldn't be an issue. Its approx. a 30 foot run. Since it's 220 and there are no open breakers what would be my connection points in the main breaker box? Also should I use 12 guage wiring?

I'm sure when I take the breaker box cover off it will slowly come back to me, but it is 220 so I'm not sure of the difference in required wiring.
 
  #9  
Old 12-06-09, 10:39 PM
F
Member
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: NE Wis / Paris France{ In France for now }
Posts: 4,807
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Originally Posted by hclife View Post
Yes, this compressor is brand new and it does have a protection button.
Très bon { Very good } that will not be a issue at all.


Actually the sub-panel idea seems like a better plan. I did finished the basement 2 years ago, so I'm familiar with 110 wiring and code. when I finished the basement I did use the open breaker spots so the panel is full.
Ok but can you still give me the breaker model number because there is a possiblty that I can able suggest a quad breaker to replace two single pole breakers.

It does have a drop ceiling, so wiring shouldn't be an issue. Its approx. a 30 foot run. Since it's 220 and there are no open breakers what would be my connection points in the main breaker box? Also should I use 12 guage wiring?

I'm sure when I take the breaker box cover off it will slowly come back to me, but it is 220 so I'm not sure of the difference in required wiring.
That will be much eaiser to run the new cable to the subpanel and typically most subpanel I set up normally use 40 amp size but you can go high as 60 amp so you will have plenty room to load it up pretty nice.

Typically 40 amp will need #8 -3 w/g { it will have black et red et white and bare conductor in there }
If you want other size let me know then myself or other member will qoute the proper conductor size.

To run the 240v circuit with 3 conductor cable it is not bad at all due you have black et red so that is for your line connection while white one is used for netural connection the last is bare { some case green } that will land at the main load centre neutal bussbar but once you land at subpanel you must keep the netural and ground seperated

If you used two wire cable like example black et white you have to remark the white conductor to red or other colors { but not grey or white } this is only if you have cable for indidvual conductor no it is not legit.

Look up for subpanel installment in the fourm it will be on the top just click on it it have good info there if more question just holler.

Merci,Marc
 
  #10  
Old 12-07-09, 04:10 AM
M
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA - N.E.Tn
Posts: 47,663
Received 321 Votes on 285 Posts
I'm not an electrician but I do have a 60 gallon 6.5 hp air compressor that uses 15 amps. I was advised to use a 20 amp 220 breaker because a 15 amp could trip on start up. I don't remember if I used 10 or 12 guage wire. I would think that a 30 amp drier circuit wouldn't provide enough protection but remember - I'm just a painter Running a new 220 circuit isn't all that difficult and in the long run would be a LOT more convenient than moving the drier to plug in the compressor every time you need to use it.

btw - welcome to the forums!
 
  #11  
Old 12-07-09, 08:01 AM
ray2047's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 33,583
Received 13 Votes on 11 Posts
I was thinking since the laundry room and the garage are back to back ...... literally the air compressor and the dryer are back to back. I figured the dryer recepticle would be easier to plug into than running wires and expanding the breaker box.
You could abandon the existing dryer cable then replace that 30a dryer breaker with a 60a breaker. Run a new line to a 60a subpanel in the garage and install breakers for the dryer and compressor in the newsubpanel. From what you write the subpanel could be on the garage side of the laundry romm wall so short run for the new dryer cable and existing receptacle reused.
 
  #12  
Old 12-07-09, 08:45 AM
H
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Ohio
Posts: 8
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
ok, I thought about this and decided to do a dedicated run from the main breaker box to a garage receptacle. I can add some tandem 20a breakers in the main box to make room for the 220/20amp breaker. After considering everything I'm also looking at cost and it seems this way is the best way with the least cost.

This is about a 30ft run, so is 12/3 wire ok for this run? Also what is the best receptacle to use?

Would it be a good idea to add some kind of shut-off switch at the receptacle to act as an emergency shut-off if needed.
 
  #13  
Old 12-07-09, 09:22 AM
I
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Near Lansing, Michigan
Posts: 10,943
Received 43 Votes on 41 Posts
Originally Posted by hclife View Post
This is about a 30ft run, so is 12/3 wire ok for this run? Also what is the best receptacle to use?
12/2 cable is okay -- the white wire is remarked black or red with tape or marker. The compressor doesn't use a neutral. You can do 12/3 romex if you want for a bit more flexibility in the future. The compressor should be wired with a 12/3* flexible cord like SJOW and a NEMA 6-15P plug on the end. I would use a 20A double-pole breaker and a NEMA 6-20R (heavy duty/commercial/spec-grade) receptacle. Note the "T" shaped slot allows you to connect either 15A or 20A cords. This allows some flexibility to connect other tools like a table saw if you happen to find a good deal at Home Depot someday.



Would it be a good idea to add some kind of shut-off switch at the receptacle to act as an emergency shut-off if needed.
The cord and receptacle counts as a means of disconnect by code.

Regarding the previous posts, I think the dryer circuit would be okay if you needed to do that instead. The motor has thermal protection and is rated 15A. The dryer circuit is 30A, but the code generally allows for a breaker 200% larger when dealing with motors like compressors so my opinion is that you would be within code to use the dryer receptacle if necessary.

* This part is confusing: Romex cables type NM-B do not count the bare ground wire so 12/2 actually has black, white, bare; 12/3 has black, red, white, bare. Flexible cords like SJOW do count the ground wire so 12/3 has black, white, green. That is why you need 12/2 cable in the wall but 12/3 cord to the unit.
 
  #14  
Old 12-07-09, 03:06 PM
H
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Ohio
Posts: 8
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Works Great

OK, all done. this is what I did.

Purchased some tandem breakers to make room for the 220 breaker. I decided to use a 220/20a breaker for the compressor.
Wired 12/3 wire from the panel to the garage (just used both the bare and white for ground, red and black for the 220, 110 each).

In the garage I put in a 250v/20a, 2-pole, 3-wire receptacle.


Then used a flex 12 guage power cord, green/ground, white/pwr/110, black/pwr/110. Then fitted the appropriate plug.

The compressor seems to be working good.

I do have 1 more question, when I wired the power to the compressor switch, I did notice an extra ground screw and also noticed an unused ground screw on the compressor motor itself.

Should I ground the compressor motor to the switch ground, in turn, which is grounded to the receptacle ground?
 
  #15  
Old 12-07-09, 04:26 PM
ray2047's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 33,583
Received 13 Votes on 11 Posts
Good except:
just used both the bare and white for ground
Neutral should never be tied to ground. I will leave the grounding question to the pros.
 
  #16  
Old 12-07-09, 06:41 PM
H
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Ohio
Posts: 8
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
12/2 cable is okay -- the white wire is remarked black or red with tape or marker. The compressor doesn't use a neutral.
I already purchased the 12/3 wire, since the compressor doesn't require a neutral I just used both the white and bare wires as a ground.

Am I incorrect? anyone?
 
  #17  
Old 12-07-09, 07:05 PM
ray2047's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 33,583
Received 13 Votes on 11 Posts
Originally Posted by hclife View Post
I already purchased the 12/3 wire, since the compressor doesn't require a neutral I just used both the white and bare wires as a ground.

Am I incorrect? anyone?
Yes. It should be capped. It can in some cases cause dangerous current flow in the ground. It is a violation of the NEC except at the first OCPD (breaker/fuse) panel.
 
  #18  
Old 12-07-09, 07:31 PM
H
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Ohio
Posts: 8
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
It can in some cases cause dangerous current flow in the ground.
Makes sense, so basically just disco the neutral at the receptacle and the breaker box and just use the bare ground?



So my receptacle will be: the sideways "T" prong black (110) the flat "-" prong red (110) and the "G" is bare ground?
 
  #19  
Old 12-08-09, 06:11 AM
Tolyn Ironhand's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Twin Cities, MN
Posts: 13,635
Received 209 Votes on 185 Posts
Originally Posted by hclife View Post
Makes sense, so basically just disco the neutral at the receptacle and the breaker box and just use the bare ground?
Correct.

Originally Posted by hclife View Post
So my receptacle will be: the sideways "T" prong black (110) the flat "-" prong red (110) and the "G" is bare ground?
Correct again.
 
Reply
Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: