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How to wire 3 new outlets in a bedroom from an existing stub?

How to wire 3 new outlets in a bedroom from an existing stub?

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  #1  
Old 12-27-09, 10:57 PM
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How to wire 3 new outlets in a bedroom from an existing stub?

This summer I moved into an old Craftsman home to discover that the master bedroom only has one electrical outlet. However, there is a wall sconce (working) on the opposite side of the room where I want the additional outlets. It does not appear to be a switched circuit as the sconce has a knob-style switch on it and neither the closet switch nor the ceiling fixture switch control it.

For purposes of knowing how to do this right the first time, I can tell you that one new outlet will run a small lamp (75 watt bulb) and clock radio, another my TV and DVD player and the third a 110 volt window a/c unit. Up till now I've been able to run all of these -- with the TV and A/C running at the same time -- simply using two extension cords pugged into the outlet across the room. I have not experienced any dimming or blown circuit at the breaker. I mention this as the online wiring diagrams I've looked at mention not to exceed the line's "capacity" though they never say what that capacity is or how to determine it.

The walls are lath and plaster but I've already cut the holes where I want the outlets located so that isn't a part of my installation problem. (So far.) I'm a decent plasterer.

The wires coming into the room (behind the sconce) are enclosed in an old-looking black casing which measures 5/8" in diameter. THERE IS NO GROUND WIRE. How to deal with that is one of my questions as the Romex I'm using, of course, has a ground wire. But let me move on to rest of it. But for now, know that to the best my eye can tell the wires behind the sconce look 14 gauge as is the Romex I've purchased.

The location and use of the outlets I want to install off these wires are to be placed as follows and I don't know if this makes any difference in how they get wired together: the outlet for the lamp and clock radio needs to be to the LEFT of the sconce (which, of course, is high up on the wall), the A/C outlet will be placed to the RIGHT of the sconce and the TV/DVD player outlet is further to the right from the A/C outlet.

Do I need to run my wires to the outlet on the left first and then sequentially to the other two or can I place a junction box straight down from the sconce and then send the Romex left and right inside the wall?

My other question is do I wire the next outlet down the series into the LOWER black and white set of screws on the outlet? While that's what it looks like in all the diagrams I've read, nobody ever SAYS it so I want to be sure.

And again, how do I make sure all outlets are grounded as there is no ground wire from the original wiring behind the sconce?

Sorry to take all this space to explain the exact situation but I don't want to make any mistakes by having left out some important detail.

Thanks in advance!

CJ Green
 
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  #2  
Old 12-28-09, 07:57 AM
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And again, how do I make sure all outlets are grounded as there is no ground wire from the original wiring behind the sconce?
By NEC code you can NOT extend an ungrounded circuit so if the sconce is ungrounded you can not run your circuit from it. You will need to run a new circuit back to the panel.

If the sconce was wired with conduit or BX it may be grounded. Some early NM cable with ground the ground wire was terminated out side the box. If the latter is true when you pull the cover from the breaker/fuse panel you should see some bare wires going to the ground/neutral bar. If you decide to pull the cover be very careful. There are live components inside even with the main breaker off.

Bedrooms now require AFCI. Depending on your AHJ you may be required to add an AFCI breaker.
 
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Old 12-31-09, 02:20 PM
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Ray,

While I thank you for your response, I'm not a professional electrician so I haven't a clue what all the acronyms stand for.

Also, isn't there a way to ground this line directly to the actual ground outside of the house instead of running it to the breaker box? What would I need to do that?

Plus, could someone tell me the proper wiring series for this set-up whether or not I have the ground in place yet?

Thanks in advance.

Best,

C...
 
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Old 12-31-09, 02:42 PM
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Abbreviations

NEC=National Electric Code
NM=Non Metallic
AFCI=Arc Fault Circuit Interruptor
AHJ=Authority Having Jurisdiction, ie Inspection department
 

Last edited by pcboss; 01-02-10 at 02:59 PM. Reason: corrected AHJ definition
  #5  
Old 12-31-09, 02:45 PM
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Sorry, I always get nervous when basic electrical questions get asked here. Wiring can be pretty straight forward but mess it up and you can burn your house down. Hit the local Lowes or Home Depot and pick up a book or two on wiring. We're here when you have further questions.
 
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Old 12-31-09, 03:39 PM
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While I thank you for your response, I'm not a professional electrician so I haven't a clue what all the acronyms stand for.
Sorry I hate that to. Wirepuller gave you a pretty complete list. Just to add NM is also known by the manufacturer's name, Romex. AHJ stands for Authority Having Jurisdiction.
Plus, could someone tell me the proper wiring series for this set-up whether or not I have the ground in place yet?
You can not do this if there is no ground and it is unlikely you have a ground. See my first reply. You need to run a new circuit from the breaker box. We will be glad to help you with this but first as Mitch suggested get a book and "study up" a bit then we will have common base to work from.
 
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Old 01-02-10, 04:06 PM
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Ray did have very good advise here per NEC code normally we can not extend unground circuits like your situation however I know one legit way can be done by using the GFCI receptale plus you have to put the sticker on say " no equiment grounding " that one way it can be legit but really for myself my best advise to you is run the new NM cable from the load centre to the new receptale and work it way from there.

Mitch have right idea on the book you can go to the big box store they will have " wiring simplifed " and there is couple other books in there they useally are about 10 or so.

If you have more question myself or others in here will reply to your question.

Merci,Marc
 
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Old 01-05-10, 01:29 PM
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Thanks, guys.

Unfortunately I own three books on wiring but I haven't been able to unpack my 60+ boxes of books in the new house yet. Guess I'll own four now unless the library has one.

Isn't there a way to run a ground directly to the literal ground (dirt) outside the bedroom in question? Bury a length of rebar and run a new ground wire to that from these outlets?

Okay, I'll go read up on it.

Thanks again.

CJ
 
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Old 01-05-10, 02:55 PM
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Isn't there a way to run a ground directly to the literal ground (dirt) outside the bedroom in question? Bury a length of rebar and run a new ground wire to that from these outlets?
No, that would not provide an acceptable low impedance path and would not be code compliant. You could run a single wire back to the panel or to the panel ground but it is unclear from what I have read here if that could be extended to other receptacles.
 
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