Any special NEC codes for garage ceiling receptacles?

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Old 01-04-10, 09:51 AM
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Any special NEC codes for garage ceiling receptacles?

Aside from the general NECs, are there any special electric codes that apply to installing a ceiling receptacle inside a garage (for a garage door opener)? The wiring for my application will run through the attic.

Also, are there any special types of ceiling boxes/ faceplates I should be using or can I use the standard items you would normally use for receptacles inside the home?
 
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Old 01-04-10, 10:26 AM
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Standard boxes a devices are fine. If the ceiling is sheetrocked I suggest using a remodel box. If you are on the 2008 code the receptacle is required to be GFCI protected.
 

Last edited by Tolyn Ironhand; 01-04-10 at 12:28 PM.
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Old 01-04-10, 10:34 AM
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*Very* important that the outlet be on a GFCI circuit or be a GFCI outlet!

There have been small children electrocuted by touching metal garage doors operated by malfunctioning garage door openers.
 
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Old 01-04-10, 10:57 AM
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Originally Posted by Tolyn Ironhand View Post
...I suggest using a remodel box.
Any pictures online that I could view to see what type of box I'm looking for? Google didn't return much.

I find educating myself on electrical box types to be impossible. I usually wander through the electrical aisle and eye-ball all the different types to find one that looks good.


Originally Posted by Bill190 View Post
*Very* important that the outlet be on a GFCI circuit or be a GFCI outlet!
Yes, definitely. My whole house is practically GFCI protected. It's probably overkill but worth it in my eyes.
 

Last edited by Tolyn Ironhand; 01-04-10 at 12:29 PM. Reason: fixed my typo ;)
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Old 01-04-10, 11:33 AM
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The old-work (a.k.a. remodel) box has adjustable fins that protrude from the sides. You cut a hole to a particular dimension in the drywall with a keyhole saw, insert the box so the outer tabs rest on the drywall, and tighten the screws to extend the fins. The box is then secured to the drywall without the need for nails.

The wiring for my application will run through the attic.
The cable should run along a framing member or running board for protection. It can be stapled atop the trusses if it is sufficiently out of the way so that it can't be stepped on. If your attic has stairs, the cable must be protected for the whole length. If no stairs, protection is only required where the cable is within 6' of a scuttle hole.
 
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Old 01-04-10, 11:41 AM
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Originally Posted by ibpooks View Post
If your attic has stairs, the cable must be protected for the whole length. If no stairs, protection is only required where the cable is within 6' of a scuttle hole.
And "protection" meaning like an electrical conduit? Or something else?

The attic does have stairs, however from what I'm reading, the 2x4 joists aren't for storage so aside from maintenance/ improvement, no one will be traveling up there.

There are many preexisting wires in the attic, most are stapled to framing members but none have any type of protection. Is there anything simple I can do to protect them?
 
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Old 01-04-10, 11:52 AM
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Either run the wiring parallel along a framing member, or nail a running board perpendicular to the trusses to run the cable along. Something simple like a 1x3 or 2x4 would be sufficient protection.
 
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Old 01-06-10, 12:06 PM
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And what about adding a receptacle in the attic, any special codes to follow there?

I'm putting a GFCI receptacle inside a square box and mounting it to the joist. The basic idea is to have an outlet in the attic and to protect the garage receptacles down-stream.

I'm going to put a metal cover over the receptacle too.

Anything else special that I need to do?
 
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Old 01-06-10, 12:26 PM
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If a metal box is used the box must also be bonded to the grounding conductor. There should be a tapped hole for a 10-32 screw in the back of the box.

The receptacle itself needs to be held to the cover with 2 screws. The older covers with a single screw for a duplex no longer meet the code.

If it were me i would not put the GFI in the attic. I would not want to go to the attic if it were to trip.
 
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Old 01-06-10, 02:42 PM
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Originally Posted by pcboss View Post
If it were me i would not put the GFI in the attic. I would not want to go to the attic if it were to trip.
It's definitely not desirable but I donít have much of a choice right now. Iíd like to AFI protect the whole circuit so that forces me to use a GFCI receptacle. Unfortunately, the first receptacle is on the ceiling for the garage door opener and the only easily accessible receptacle is the last one in the circuit. I have a junction box in the attic that I was going to put the GFCI receptacle in just for some measure of protection.

My main reason for AFI protection was the mouse problem that Iíve had in the past.
 
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Old 01-06-10, 03:29 PM
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Put a GFCI receptacle at each location and only wire the LINE terminals. This way the GFCI will only trip for a device plugged in directly at this receptacle, not downstream. You would only need to reset the attic GFCI if something in the attic tripped it.
 
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Old 01-06-10, 04:11 PM
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Good suggestion Ben. ...................................
 
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Old 01-07-10, 08:20 AM
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Originally Posted by ibpooks View Post
Put a GFCI receptacle at each location and only wire the LINE terminals. This way the GFCI will only trip for a device plugged in directly at this receptacle, not downstream. You would only need to reset the attic GFCI if something in the attic tripped it.
How susceptible are GFCIs to false trips? All my bedrooms are GFCI protected and I have yet <knock, knock> to trip anything. (Yes, I test them regularly)
Obviously in a garage with power tools, Iíd assume a higher percentage of false trips, but are we talking a daily occurrence?

Thank you for the help by the way.
 
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Old 01-07-10, 08:45 AM
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In the last 10 years or so the manufacturers have gotten very good at eliminating false trips.
 
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