Wiring GFCI w/ 9 wires

Reply

  #1  
Old 01-05-10, 08:50 PM
S
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Phoenix, AZ
Posts: 106
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Question Wiring GFCI w/ 9 wires

Hey folks,

I have a (hopefully) easy question for the electrically smart people here. I recently bought a foreclosure and am in the process of fixing up the various snafus the previous owner created while remodeling. I've managed to sort out most of the electrical issues, but have been stymied by one circuit.

There are 6 outlets on this circuit, and possibly one other thing I can't find. It is set up as follows:

15amp breaker --12AWG--> GFCI --12--> Recep. 2, 3 & 4
|
|--12--> ?? --14-->Recep. 5 & 6
(I hope that turns out...)

So, basically, I have 9 wires (3 x hot, 3 x neutral & 3 x ground): a GFCI that has 1 hot in and needs to have 2 protected hots out.

What is the best way to do this? I am inclined to wirenut the 2 outbounds together and add in a pigtail so that I have only 4 wires into/out of the GFCI, splitting the downstream circuits after the GFCI.

The other alternative, it would seem, would be to keep the downstream wires separate and use the 4 stick'n'stab holes in the GFCI.

Also, a separate question: what is considered to be 'small appliances'? Would things like a mixer, food processor, crock pot, etc. count, or are we just looking at the microwave, dishwasher, etc. here? (I ask only because, as noted earlier, this circuit is on a 15amp breaker. If those things are considered small appliances, I understand I need to have them on a 20amp breaker which means I'll need to either a) upgrade the 14 AWG wire on the circuit, or b) move that branch onto another circuit.)

Thanks in advance for any assistance y'all can offer!
-Shalie
 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 01-05-10, 09:02 PM
B
Member
Join Date: Oct 2008
Posts: 1,312
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
The wirenuts and pigtail is the best option.

Then for a kitchen, two 20 amp GFCI countertop circuits are required. And yes 12 ga. all the way.

You would need to track down ALL the wiring to be sure it was all replaced with 12 ga. (Find the missing link! )

And you need 20 amp circuits in a kitchen because those "small appliances" tend to use a BIG amount of electricity! (Anything that warms/heats.)
 
  #3  
Old 01-05-10, 09:04 PM
ray2047's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 33,597
Received 13 Votes on 11 Posts
Receptacles 5 and 6 need to be rewired with #12, "??" identified, and the 15a breaker replaced with a 20a breaker.

A good quality GFCI is designed to take two wires under the pressure plate so to pigtail or not will likely be your choice.

Dishwashers need to be on their own circuit. Ideally 20a so garbage disposal can share the circuit. Of course you have watch the combined amperage but both can usually share a circuit.

Counter top microwaves do not need a separate circuit but over the stove ones should.
 
  #4  
Old 01-06-10, 05:01 AM
pcboss's Avatar
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: Maryland
Posts: 15,144
Received 84 Votes on 72 Posts
Given the amount of space a GFI takes up along with the 3 cables of wiring I would not use a pigtail that adds to the volume. Like Ray said the back-wired GFI plates are for up to 2 conductors without a pigtail.

I agree with all the other advice especially about finding and replacing the #14 wire.
 
  #5  
Old 01-06-10, 02:22 PM
S
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Phoenix, AZ
Posts: 106
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Thank you, everyone, for your replies. I really appreciate it!

Finding the missing link shouldn't be too hard (I hope). I was hoping to just be lazy (and not have to go up into my filthy attic again), but.... oh well.

I'm glad to know that I can definitely run two protected hots out of my GFCI, and that it doesn't seem horribly complicated. I think I AM going to go with the pigtail option - the person who originally installed the box didn't leave any extra wire, so in addition to working in a crowded space, I'm dealing with short wires. (I honestly don't understand how you professionals can maneuver. I've got little girl hands and can barely manage with some of this stuff.) I've already taken out the original box and have installed a deeper one, so now I've got a little room to add the extra wires and still have space for the GFCI's bulk.

Good to know about the dishwasher requiring its own circuit. Mine is definitely not on one of its own. Nor is my fridge, I think. I assume it will need its own as well?

Again: my thanks to you all!
-Shalie
 
  #6  
Old 01-06-10, 02:28 PM
pcboss's Avatar
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: Maryland
Posts: 15,144
Received 84 Votes on 72 Posts
The refrigerator can share one of the 20 amp small appliance branch circuits. You can also run a dedicated circuit for it if you choose, but there is no code requirement for it unless the manufacturer calls for one. Large Sub-Zeros and Vikings might require a dedicated circuit. Most will not.
 
Reply
Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: