Stumped with GFCI

Reply

  #1  
Old 01-09-10, 04:01 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: New Jersey
Posts: 199
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Stumped with GFCI

I installed a GFCI and then a downstream regular outlet on a kitchen circuit. When testing the GFCI with a tester, the lights indicate it's wired correctly. When I press the button on the tester, the outlet shuts off as expected.

On the downstream outlet, the tester first indicates the outlet is wired correctly. When I press the button on the tester, the GFCI will buzz and the tester lights remain on indicating a hot/negative reverse.

I've checked the downstream outlet and the wiring is correct. Hot to brass, white to silver and ground to green.

On the GFCI, I have the source white/hot on the LINE half. White is connected to the silver side and hot is connected to the brass screw. On the LOAD half, I have the white/hot wires going to the downstream outlet. In the plastic outlet box, I have the two neutrals (source/downstream) connected together with a pigtail to the ground of the GFCI.

I'm stumped as to why this isn't working! Any thoughts? The electrical inspector was the one to point this out, so the permit will not be signed off until I can get this fixed.

Thanks // MarkDIY
 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 01-09-10, 04:22 PM
ray2047's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 33,597
Received 13 Votes on 11 Posts
have the two neutrals (source/downstream) connected together with a pigtail to the ground of the GFCI.
You NEVER connect ground to neutral. Was that a typo or am I misreading?
 
  #3  
Old 01-09-10, 04:27 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: New Jersey
Posts: 199
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Oops -- you're right - the two grounds (not neutrals) are connected together with a pigtail to the ground screw on GFCI.

I have another GFCI on the same circuit and I wonder if this is affecting it. There is a junction box before the GFCI in question that has a connection to another GFCI on the other side of the kitchen.
 
  #4  
Old 01-09-10, 05:38 PM
ray2047's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 33,597
Received 13 Votes on 11 Posts
It's best to have only one GFCI on a circuit. If you have more then one the next GFCI should be fed from the line side not the load side. Of course you can't do that if there are any regular receptacles in between unless those receptacles don't require GFCI protection. In that case you need to replace the second GFCI with a regular receptacle and feed from the load side.
 
Reply

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Display Modes
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: