I think I got the wrong product....?

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Old 01-10-10, 04:14 PM
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I think I got the wrong product....?

Hi, Guys;

Hey, I just ordered a new UPS (uninterruptible power supply)for my office servers, and it just came....problem is, the PLUG on the thing has an L5-30 connector.

So, what does this mean....? Is there an adapter I can get? should I send the unit back? Do I need to have a new wall connection put in that can accomodate this kind of plug?

HELP!! lol....
 
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Old 01-10-10, 04:31 PM
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If the UPS is what you need so far as back-up requirements, then have an electrician run a new circuit and install the proper outlet for you. (Things which use more power than a regular outlet can provide have special plugs.)

These kind of outlets / plugs are common in computer rooms I have worked in in the past.

Don't replace the plug!
 
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Old 01-10-10, 04:49 PM
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A unit with that plug would require a 30 amp circuit. That will definitely require a new circuit.

Are you sure you need that much backup capacity?
 
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Old 01-10-10, 05:04 PM
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I spoke with my Product Rep at Dell, and he had a Rep from APC on the line at the same time....I gace them the model numbers of the servers, and all the peripherals (DSL Modem, switch, Firewall, etc), and this was the one he came back with, based upon the time that was needed fro a graceful shutdown in the event of a power outage.

So, yeah, this is what we need power-wise.....

What do you guys think it would cost to have the building add in another circuit? Any other alternatives?

Thanks!
 
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Old 01-10-10, 05:23 PM
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There are too many variables to give any price estimates. Since this sounds like it is in a commercial building you or the landlord should have a licensed contractor perform the install.
 
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Old 01-10-10, 05:31 PM
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True....good point. There is a REAL power problem in this building, outages on regular basis, so I may be able to leverage that in this situation....

Thanks, guys....I love reading all the stuff you guys put up here!
 
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Old 01-10-10, 05:40 PM
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As others stated, it certainly needs a dedicated 30A circuit with the correct receptacle. If it's for your house, i't would be similar to running a dryer circuit. As others have stated, if it's going into an office building, you certainly want to get an electrical contractor to do the work. My guess would be a few hundred $$, but there's no way to say without seeing the install.

Your other option would be to return this unit and get two smaller UPS that can be fed by existing 15A or 20A circuits (presuming you have them already installed)
 
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Old 01-10-10, 07:10 PM
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Originally Posted by Headhunting55 View Post
True....good point. There is a REAL power problem in this building, outages on regular basis, so I may be able to leverage that in this situation....

Thanks, guys....I love reading all the stuff you guys put up here!
Is it a power problem in just the building? Or is there an issue with the utility (ie: blackouts/brownouts)? If it is just the building, then you can try and get the landlord to foot the bill. If it's utility, then there's not much you can do.

How much equipment are we actually talking about here? One rack full? Two? More? I only ask because I have 5 Poweredge servers plus a telephone system (and of course the switches and modems) split between 2 APC 1500VA systems. Each one shows less than 30% load, and they provide plenty of time for shutdown. Depending on the load you have, it may be more economical to go with the two smaller units over having a branch circuit installed.

What kind of capacity does the unit they sent you have?
 
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Old 01-11-10, 09:36 AM
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They usually WAY oversell UPS capacity because they compute if with the maximum possible draw of all connected machines, not the typical or measured. For example a server with a 750W power supply may only draw 300W as configured, but Dell will tell you it needs a 900W UPS (750W + 20%). This would only be possible if your server was completely loaded with all the drive bays full, CPUs full, RAM full, and all operating at 100% utilization. That assumption is so far from the norm that the UPS is usually vastly oversized.

If you have a 20A circuit already at your equipment (NEMA 5-20 t-slot), I would get back in contact with Dell/Apc and see if a 20A UPS would suffice. If not, you will need to have an electrician install a new circuit.
 
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