Upgrading from 2-prong to 3-prong outlets...

Reply

  #1  
Old 02-05-10, 01:08 PM
P
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: WV
Posts: 24
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Upgrading from 2-prong to 3-prong outlets...

In a bedroom, I am replacing the old outlets with 3-prong outlets. However, the grounding wires are twisted around a screw in the back of the box and are too short to reach the outlet's grounding screw.

What would be the proper way to remedy this problem?

Thanks

[ View Image ]
 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 02-05-10, 01:23 PM
ray2047's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 33,597
Received 13 Votes on 11 Posts
Use a pre=made ground pigtail or self-grounding receptacles.

If you go with pigtail and there is a second tapped hole in the box you could use that hole with out disturbing what is there. The new pigtail would go to the receptacle. If there is room you may be able to place the pigtail under the same screw. Multiple wires under one screw can be iffy. I'd suggest remove the wires and fasten two pigtails with a wire nut. One pigtail would go to the box and one to receptacle.
 
  #3  
Old 02-05-10, 01:37 PM
P
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: WV
Posts: 24
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Wait, are you saying that the ground wires need to stay connected to the box? I thought it only needed to be on the grounding screw on the receptacle.

Thanks for the prompt response.
 
  #4  
Old 02-05-10, 02:12 PM
I
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Near Lansing, Michigan
Posts: 10,944
Received 43 Votes on 41 Posts
The grounds need to be connected to both the box and the receptacle ground screw. They also must be mechanically connected with a wirenut, crimp, or push-in connector. Twisting used to be legal, but it not anymore.

When the ground wires are very short, I find Ideal's push-in connectors to be very effective.

IDEAL INDUSTRIES, INC. - In-Sure™ Push-In Wire Connectors
 
  #5  
Old 02-05-10, 03:06 PM
P
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: WV
Posts: 24
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Might I ask why the ground also needs connected to the screw in the box? What's the logic behind it and is it actually required or just a good safety precaution?

Thanks again.
 
  #6  
Old 02-05-10, 09:07 PM
CasualJoe's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: United States
Posts: 10,645
Received 85 Votes on 75 Posts
Originally Posted by Phaaze View Post
Might I ask why the ground also needs connected to the screw in the box? What's the logic behind it and is it actually required or just a good safety precaution?

Thanks again.
It's a code requirement, all metal boxes must be grounded.
 
  #7  
Old 02-06-10, 05:14 AM
chandler's Avatar
Banned. Rule And/Or Policy Violation
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 39,967
Received 5 Votes on 5 Posts
Ben, as Ray mentioned, couldn't he just use self grounding receptacles? Or is the pigtail necessary, now? The push connectors are right up there with sliced bread.
 
  #8  
Old 02-06-10, 07:21 AM
W
Member
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: VA.
Posts: 813
Received 1 Vote on 1 Post
The use of self-grounding receptacles would be allowed if these were surface mounted. Then it would be required to remove at least one of the insulating washers.
 
  #9  
Old 02-06-10, 07:42 AM
Tolyn Ironhand's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Twin Cities, MN
Posts: 13,610
Received 205 Votes on 182 Posts
Originally Posted by wirenut1110 View Post
The use of self-grounding receptacles would be allowed if these were surface mounted. Then it would be required to remove at least one of the insulating washers.
Self grounding wiring devices do not need to be attached to surface mounted metal boxes to be effective. The yoke does not even have to be in contact with the metal box. For more info go here: Podcasts and Videos and watch video "Are self-grounding wiring devices reliable?"

In Phaaze's project, use of a self grounding receptacle would be a perfect choice.
 
  #10  
Old 02-06-10, 05:19 PM
P
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: WV
Posts: 24
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
I had already purchased and began installing the receptacles before knowing that self grounding ones even existed. However, I've taken a picture of how I've wired them and would appreciate it if someone could tell me if it is acceptable.

[ View Wiring ]

Also, when taking the old receptacles off it did all that damage to the wall because there were several layers of paint on it. Because of the uneven surface, I am unable to tighten the screws to hold the receptacle stable without bending the metal so far that the faceplate is unable to fit properly. Therefore, I spackled it up a bit. It should dry strong enough to hold the receptacle securely, correct?

[ View Spackled Surface ]

It's still drying so I haven't sanded it down or anything yet...


Comments, suggestions, and ideas are more than welcome!
Thanks
 
  #11  
Old 02-06-10, 05:57 PM
ray2047's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 33,597
Received 13 Votes on 11 Posts
Try scoring around the cover with a utility knife before removing the cover plate. Can't see detail of how the ground wire fastens to the box but what I see looks good.

Suggestion: You seem to be using solid bare wire for your ground pigtails. Ready-made stranded green insulated pigtails may make getting all the wires in easier.
 
  #12  
Old 02-06-10, 06:05 PM
P
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: WV
Posts: 24
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
The ground simply loops around the screw on the back of the box them comes forward into the receptacle.
 
  #13  
Old 02-06-10, 06:29 PM
Tolyn Ironhand's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Twin Cities, MN
Posts: 13,610
Received 205 Votes on 182 Posts
That screw it not a grounding screw. It is the clamp screw. To be proper, you should use a green ground screw attached to the back of the box using the threaded hole. The proper hole is the smaller hole in the middle right of the box shown in your first picture.

The method that you grounded the device and the box is correct. Just use the proper screw and hole.
 
  #14  
Old 02-06-10, 06:38 PM
P
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: WV
Posts: 24
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Thanks for the information Tolyn. When I first opened it up, the grounding wires were originally connected to the clamp screw so I assumed it was correct.
 
Reply
Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: