Mounting a ceiling fixture into a prewired box. Dilemma.

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Old 02-06-10, 08:18 PM
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Cool Mounting a ceiling fixture into a prewired box. Dilemma.

I live in a newly constructed apartment building. Each room has a space for a ceiling fixture which can be added by the tenant. It is prewired with the standard white, black, red, and ground. It currently has a cover on it to hide the hole. I have purchased a ceiling light that I would like to install.

The problem I am having is that the junction box does not seem to be mounted flush with the drywall. The junction box is aproximately 1" below the surface of the drywall. The screws currently in the junction box are 3" screws and go through an outter hole and connecting to an inner hole at the bottom of the junction box. My problem is mounting the ceiling fixture to the junction box. The ceiling fixture is not a flush mount. It is raised about 2" from where it lies against the ceiling. The screws provided with the light are 3" screws. I'm thinking I would need about a 5" long screw to make this work. However, Home Depot does not make anything like this.

Suggestions?

Here are some pictures to describe what I am facing:

A picture of the ceiling fixture I am trying to install


A picture of the ceiling cover where the fixture will be mounted.


A picture of the junction box with the cap removed.


A picture of the 3" long screw from outter to inner hole


A picture showing the depth of the raised fixture.
 
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Old 02-06-10, 09:57 PM
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The problem I am having is that the junction box does not seem to be mounted flush with the drywall. The junction box is aproximately 1" below the surface of the drywall.
You would add a mudring to bring it out but of course if it is an apartment for legal reasons the work should be done by an electrician.
 
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Old 02-06-10, 11:49 PM
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Due you mention new construction apartement buliding you should get a hold of landlord and have them get the electrician come out and deal with this due state laws are very strict with apartment buildings.

That junction box you describing that is legit ceiling fan box.

Merci,Marc
 
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Old 02-07-10, 04:52 AM
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A brass ceiling fixture bracket like this may work for you. Disregard the canopy, etc, it's the only picture I could find.

You may be able to mount this bracket to your box, then mount the fixture to the bracket, since your fixture and this bracket is made for multiple mounting boxes. This would bring the bracket flush with the ceiling and shorten your screw length.

 
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Old 02-07-10, 06:44 AM
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As the other posters have alluded to that ceiling box should have been flush with the finished drywall surface.
 
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Old 02-07-10, 12:42 PM
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If the bottom of the ceiling outlet-box is an 1-1/2" above the ceiling finish, then an "extension box" , an 1-1/2" in depth, , will provide an outlet-box surface that is flush with the ceiling finish.
 
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Old 02-07-10, 02:03 PM
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Yes, the ceiling box should have been flush or an 1/8" recess however, the boxes were hung with the "assumption" of 1/2" rock but, it looks like it may be a firewall with double 5/8" which is the reason for the deep recess.

The OP stated it was about an inch from flush so a "normal" box extension wouldn't work because it would protrude a 1/2" beyond the rock.

The ultimate situation would be, if the attic is accessible, is to lower the box. Otherwise, field modifications are acceptable. The old, "adapt and overcome".

Hell, if everything was cut and dry and on paper, anyone could do it.
 
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Old 02-07-10, 04:39 PM
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While the poster can't do the work if it was possible for him to do it I might suggest just replacing the new-work box with an old-work fan box if he couldn't find a suitable mud ring or extension.

(I have done a Google image search a couple of times and really didn't come up with an octagon mud ring and extension boxes I found were too deep.)
 
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Old 02-10-10, 06:51 PM
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Thank you all!

I want to thank everybody for their reply. It was able to help me overcome my issue, as well as I received some off forum help that was useful.

I ended up having to purchase a 1 1/2" octagonal extension box, 10-24 x 2" screws(2) and 8-32 X 2" screws (2).

I then mounted the extension box to the original box with the 10-24 screws, and then mounted the fixture to the extension with the 8-32 screws. It actually helped that the extension was protruding beyond the rock because of the fact the fixture had a 2" gap, as shown in the pictures above, from the bottom of the unit which lies flush with the wall to the point where the screws attach to the fixture.

All told, the fixture cost me $15 and then another $4 in supplies from Home Depot as nothing that was provided.
 
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