Wiring an "Over-Range" Microwave

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Old 02-08-10, 12:17 PM
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Wiring an "Over-Range" Microwave

I'd like to install a new. over-range microwave which will also serve as an external vent/hood. The manufacturer recommends a dedicated circuit but, adding a circuit back to the primary panel would be very difficult. Is there a way I can tap the 30A circuit for the cooktop but protect the 15A feed to the microwave? I imagine this is a bad idea? Any suggestions? Thanks in advance.
 
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Old 02-08-10, 01:22 PM
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Yes, it is a bad idea. Most likely the cooktop is 240 volts without a neutral that would be needed by the microwave. Regardless of the difficulty you need to follow the directions and install a new dedicated circuit.
 
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Old 02-08-10, 03:52 PM
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What he said, bad idea!!!
 
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Old 02-09-10, 08:11 AM
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Perhaps, the best thing to do would be install a new 50A subpanel in or near the kitchen? That way, I can easily add circuits once that's in place. The kitchen, largely original since 1966 and whoafully under served in terms of lighting and power receptacles. And, I have a bright and shiny new 200A primary panel with ample room for new cuircuits.
 
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Old 02-14-10, 08:24 PM
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Originally Posted by DIYMatthew View Post
And, I have a bright and shiny new 200A primary panel with ample room for new cuircuits.
Ok, run a dedicated 20Amp circuit for the microwave and a few other 15amp circuits for your other needs. No need to run a subpanel in this case unless you want to have more than one place to reset breakers or run heavy guage more expensive wire.
 
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Old 02-15-10, 09:18 AM
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It's usually hard to find a legal spot for a subpanel in or near a kitchen. You need 30" wide x 36" deep floor to ceiling clearance for a panel. I prefer to run back to the main panel unless there's some major reason not to.

Both code and manuf instructions require a dedicated 20A circuit for the range hood, so that's the only way to do it correctly. It's usually not too terrible to find a chase with only minimal drywall repair.
 
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