help with suicide cord :)

Reply

  #1  
Old 02-19-10, 08:32 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Feb 2010
Posts: 28
help with suicide cord :)

controversial title to draw in readers!

i have a simple setup:

a wall
a computer: on one side
a battery backup: on the other side

i want to connect the computer to the battery backup through the wall

i can easily put an outlet on each side that are ONLY connected to each other (as a sort of passthrough) and not connected to any other circuit. but this would then require me to make a suicide cord so that the battery backup could make the outlet hot. (i did consider doing this and covering the cord in red electrical tape and excessive warning labels from my electronic label-maker)

what is the right way to do this?

(in case anyone is wondering why i don't just have both devices on the same side: the battery backup has a really noisy fan)
 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 02-19-10, 08:37 AM
Gunguy45's Avatar
Super Moderator
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: USA
Posts: 21,103
Well...any response to tell how to do that is going to be deleted. A double ended cord plugged into the UPS will have 120V on the loose plug.....no one will advise you how to do that.

You need to find some sort of plug that will work that you can buy an inlet to be placed in the wall...like for a generator connection.

One of the electrical guys might be able to give you an idea whats available when they check in.

Oh...and I'm not sure even that would be allowed...so the whole thread may be closed...sorry.
 
  #3  
Old 02-19-10, 08:45 AM
pcboss's Avatar
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: Maryland
Posts: 14,796
Likes Received: 3
No one will be given help to make a suicide cord.

The best solution would be an inlet on the side with the UPS and a regular receptacle on the other side. Proper boxes and wiring methods would need to be used between the new boxes.
 
  #4  
Old 02-19-10, 09:20 AM
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Near Lansing, Michigan
Posts: 10,810
Likes Received: 14


NEMA 5-15 Inlet
 
  #5  
Old 02-19-10, 09:20 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Feb 2010
Posts: 28
Originally Posted by Gunguy45 View Post
Well...any response to tell how to do that is going to be deleted. A double ended cord plugged into the UPS will have 120V on the loose plug.....no one will advise you how to do that.

Oh...and I'm not sure even that would be allowed...so the whole thread may be closed...sorry.
why would a thread be deleted where I am asking:

Originally Posted by ZippyDan
what is the right way to do this?
 
  #6  
Old 02-19-10, 09:34 AM
Gunguy45's Avatar
Super Moderator
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: USA
Posts: 21,103
Zippy...I just meant I didn't know if you could do the inlet/outlet thing legally....and I should have said "closed or locked" not deleted.....

It happens when questions get asked that just can't be done safely or legally..to prevent having to keep going back to delete incorrect answers....

Thats all I meant...not that the ? itself was the problem....

Oh and I forgot my manners....welcome to the Forums...(better late than never...lol).
 
  #7  
Old 02-19-10, 10:46 AM
Member
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Wet side of Washington state.
Posts: 18,407
Likes Received: 2
Ibpooks gave a correct answer. Another answer is to use a "power inlet module" similar to what computers use for their power inlet. You can find them at several electronics suppliers on the Internet (Digi Key is one) or you might be able to get one from your local computer repair/recycling store. Most have a 10 ampere rating although many other ratings are available.

Since you are using a UPS for the source you only need to have an ampere rating equal to or greater than the UPS output rating. You would probably need to use a blank electrical box cover to mount the inlet module and either a metal plate or a nylon plate will be easiest to work with as the hard plastic plates are quite brittle.

You definitely need to enclose it in an electrical box in the wall and use proper wiring methods to connect to an electrical box on the other wall and then to the receptacle.
 
  #8  
Old 02-20-10, 05:29 PM
Member
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Milwaukee WI
Posts: 1,338
Just curious about a similar-sounding install in an office I worked in years ago. It was done by a licensed electrical contractor.

There was a freestanding UPS to power some fire alarm equipment, a printer, and a computer terminal. On the back of the UPS was a 5-15R for output. The contractor cut & discarded the 5-15R from the end of a short heavy-duty extension cord.

He then ran the cut end of the cord through a strain relief in a stainless plate into a j-box. There it was crimped or wirenutted to 12AWG stranded for distribution. From that j-box dedicated conduit fed the FACP directly, and there were dedicated red outlets for the printer and the terminal. The 5-15P on the cord was plugged into the UPS.

Would that have met code in the late 80s?
 
  #9  
Old 02-20-10, 11:13 PM
Member
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: NE Wis / Paris France{ In France for now }
Posts: 4,808
Originally Posted by ArgMeMatey View Post
Just curious about a similar-sounding install in an office I worked in years ago. It was done by a licensed electrical contractor.

There was a freestanding UPS to power some fire alarm equipment, a printer, and a computer terminal. On the back of the UPS was a 5-15R for output. The contractor cut & discarded the 5-15R from the end of a short heavy-duty extension cord.

He then ran the cut end of the cord through a strain relief in a stainless plate into a j-box. There it was crimped or wirenutted to 12AWG stranded for distribution. From that j-box dedicated conduit fed the FACP directly, and there were dedicated red outlets for the printer and the terminal. The 5-15P on the cord was plugged into the UPS.

Would that have met code in the late 80s?
In someway it was legit but it will be better served by using flexiable conduit with proper conductors due this is a permament set up the code is pretty picky with it.

Merci,Marc
 
  #10  
Old 02-21-10, 08:14 AM
Member
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Milwaukee WI
Posts: 1,338
Originally Posted by french277V View Post
In someway it was legit but it will be better served by using flexiable conduit with proper conductors due this is a permament set up the code is pretty picky with it.

Merci,Marc
How would you terminate the flexible conduit in order to get to a 5-15P to plug into the UPS?
 
  #11  
Old 02-21-10, 11:06 AM
Banned. Rule And/Or Policy Violation
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: KS
Posts: 1,896
Originally Posted by ArgMeMatey View Post
How would you terminate the flexible conduit in order to get to a 5-15P to plug into the UPS?
Using a 'portable' UPS in that situation wouldn't be an option if done under a permit. A hardwire UPS would have to be installed. I mean your scenario is nowhere near as dangerous as a suicide cord, because there is no other live power connected to the circuit in the wall. I think the problem lies mainly with using J cord as part of a permanent circuit. You might be able to find a plug that will fit smurf tube and stranded conductors.

But as I said, if it had to be inspected, then a hardwire UPS is the only option. No one would approve a hardwire in-wall circuit with a plug on it.
 
  #12  
Old 02-21-10, 11:26 AM
Member
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: NE Wis / Paris France{ In France for now }
Posts: 4,808
I am not sure about very small UPS however with larger UPS units they do have optional for hardwired set up while med to larger units they are typically hardwired.

But I know few places they done run SJO cord from the wall junction box to UPS for both input and output connections.

Merci,Marc
 
  #13  
Old 02-22-10, 11:46 AM
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Near Lansing, Michigan
Posts: 10,810
Likes Received: 14
Some UPS units are listed for hardwire applications -- you can even buy backplates from the UPS manufacturer that have trade size knock outs instead of receptacles. Cutting off the extension cord is not up to code, but probably not the worst thing you could do in that situation.
 
Reply

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Display Modes