6" Knockout

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Old 02-20-10, 10:40 PM
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6" Knockout

While looking at various kits and catalogs for knockout punches, I noticed that most of them only go up to 4" conduit size. I did see a Greenlee one that went up to 5". So I'm just curious as to how someone in the industry would make a 6" knockout for rigid conduit. Hole saw? Also, can someone give me an example of when 6" conduit is used?

I realize this is not really DIY, but I figured that some of the experts here might be able to satisfy my curiosity.

Thanks
 
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Old 02-21-10, 12:36 AM
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The only time we used the 6 inch conduit for very large conductors or cable assambely and to bore a hole like that large typicaly use holesaw or a hydrallic knockout punch unit and both are not cheap btw

Typicaly holesaw with that large useally over 50 USD while knockout punch can go over 200 USD.

Oh yeah with 6 inch ridge conduit they are very hevey as well 6 inch EMT is not too bad but PVC is little lighter but not by wide margin at all.

And yes I do use 6 inch conduit size from time to time

Merci,Marc
 
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Old 02-21-10, 11:54 AM
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Is there a specific reason you must use 6" conduit? Most contractors would probably use parallel conduits of a smaller size such as 2 - 4 inch conduits. The labor would most likely be less too.
 
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Old 02-21-10, 12:25 PM
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wow 6" hole

right now we got a project in LA, where it calls for a 5" rigid conduits with a seal off ( for methane ), and I did not know the made seal offs in 5", the odd thing is considering the size of the switch gear and feed, I do not know why it was not done in 4" as is common for underground feeds from the Utilities, but then that's the DWP spec and you got to follow what they want. Our hydraulic knock out set goes to 4", we never have found a use for anything bigger, though we have hole saws for 5" for penetrations through the occasional firewall assembly.
 
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Old 02-21-10, 09:53 PM
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How many conductors and what size and type are they spec'd to be?
 
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Old 02-22-10, 09:33 AM
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Originally Posted by mikerios View Post
right now we got a project in LA, where it calls for a 5" rigid conduits with a seal off ( for methane ), and I did not know the made seal offs in 5", the odd thing is considering the size of the switch gear and feed, I do not know why it was not done in 4" as is common for underground feeds from the Utilities, but then that's the DWP spec and you got to follow what they want. Our hydraulic knock out set goes to 4", we never have found a use for anything bigger, though we have hole saws for 5" for penetrations through the occasional firewall assembly.
I live in NJ and one of the utility companies out here, JCP&L requires (2) 5" conduits for the primary from the pole to the transformer pad. Even though only one is used, they want so much overkill.
 
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Old 02-22-10, 10:49 AM
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If there is a 27 KV "on-property" under-ground Feeder which runs a long distance from the utility distribution equipment to a transformer , and with "bends" in the run, 5" - 6" steel conduit would be used to minimize the friction when pulling the 27 Kv cables between the two connection points.
 
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Old 02-22-10, 02:24 PM
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Originally Posted by PATTBAA View Post
If there is a 27 KV "on-property" under-ground Feeder which runs a long distance from the utility distribution equipment to a transformer , and with "bends" in the run, 5" - 6" steel conduit would be used to minimize the friction when pulling the 27 Kv cables between the two connection points.
dosent need to be steel conduit. PVC is more than sufficant as long as you use long radius sweeps.
 
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Old 02-22-10, 03:33 PM
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EJ , the "example" I submitted was in a location where achieving a "super-safe" installation was an absolute "Must" , the reason for steel conduit encased in concrete.
 
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